Wednesday, November 23, 2016

2017 Honda Rebel 500 unveiled at the IMS in California

image host image host
image host image host
image host image host image host image host image host
The new Honda Rebel 500 isn't particularly stylish, sporty, powerful or high-tech. But we suppose it could still have the potential to bring a lot of happiness to newer, younger riders

Honda recently unveiled their new US-market-only Rebel 500, a bobber-style cruiser fitted with a rather basic steel tube chassis, 8-valve 471cc liquid-cooled fuel-injected parallel-twin, and relaxed, laid-back ergonomics. Available in black, silver and red, the bike was first shown last week at the Long Beach International Motorcycle Show in California.

The new Honda Rebel’s 471cc (borrowed from the CBR500R) produces 45Nm of torque and 45bhp. The engine's crankshaft pins are phased at 180-degrees and a primary couple-balancer sits behind the cylinders, close to the bike’s centre of gravity. The primary and balancer gears use scissor gears, reducing noise. The gearbox is a 6-speed unit and Honda claim that the shotgun-style 2-1 exhaust produces 'heavy-duty pulsing sound that fits the bike's torque delivery.' Suspension comprises a 41mm fork up front, preload-adjustable twin shocks at the back and a tubular steel swingarm. The bike rides on 16-inch cast aluminium wheels, shod with 130/90 (front) and 150/80 (rear) rubber, while stopping duties are handled by a single 264mm brake disc up front, with 2-piston caliper. Two-channel ABS is standard. The bike has an 11-litre fuel tank, 190-kilo kerb weight, and delivers 26kpl in terms of fuel economy.

While not particularly stylish, powerful or high-tech, we're sure the Honda Rebel still has the potential to make a lot of newer, younger riders very happy indeed.

Kawasaki ups the ante in the supernaked segment with 2017 Z1000R

image host image host
image host image host
image host image host image host image host image host
The 2017 Kawasaki Z1000R gets Ohlins rear suspension, Brembo brakes and a new paintjob

For 2017, Kawasaki have unveiled a higher-performance Z1000 - the new, Euro 4-compliant Z1000R, which gets revised ECU settings for smoother, more consistent power delivery, and revisions to the main and pre-catalysers for reduced emissions. Braking performance has been improved in a big way, with a pair of new 310mm Brembo brake discs at front, with grooved stainless steel rotors, stainless-steel braided lines and Brembo M50 cast-aluminium monobloc radial-mount 4-piston calipers.

The 2017 Kawasaki Z1000R also gets uprated rear suspension - the new Öhlins S46DR1S rear shock features an aluminium body with single-tube construction, large φ46 mm piston, and internal air and gas chambers separated by a floating piston. This fancy spring is said to offer a more supple ride, improved stability and better high speed handling. Also, its remote preload adjuster makes it easy to adjust settings without tools, when carrying a passenger.

Revisions to the Z1000R's styling include a special black/gray paintjob with yellow-green graphics, tank pads with R edition graphics, frame pads and a seat embossed with the 'Z' mark. Output remains the same at 142bhp and 111Nm of torque, which provide highly entertaining performance in a package that weighs about 221 kilos.

Saturday, November 19, 2016

2017 Yamaha XSR900 Abarth café-racer brings the best of Japan and Italy in one cool package

image host image host
image host image host
image host image host image host image host image host
With cafe racer styling from the 1960s/1970s, a modern three-cylinder engine, and bits like ABS and traction control, the Yamaha XSR900 Abarth is one cool custom

Extending their 'sport heritage' line-up, Yamaha recently unveiled the 2017 XSR900 Abarth at the EICMA, in Milan. To create this limited-edition (production is limited to 695 units only) café-racer, bike builders Shinya Kimura and Roland Sands teamed up with Abarth, an iconic Italian company responsible for creating some truly memorable high-performance cars. With its 847cc CP3 three-cylinder engine, the XSR900 Abarth boasts 115 horsepower and 87Nm of torque. The bike is fitted with custom-built carbonfibre bodywork, suede solo seat, Akrapovič titanium exhaust and, of course, there's an exclusive red/gray paintjob and Abarth logos on the fuel tank, front fender and seat cowl.

While the Yamaha XSR Abarth's styling is inspired by the 1960s, the technology is very much from 2016 - there's ABS, traction control and a slipper clutch, and the bike rides on modern 17-inch wheels shod with 120/70 (front) and 180/55 (rear) tyres. Stopping duties are handled by twin 298mm brake discs at the front and a single 245mm disc at the back. The bike weighs 195 kilos and the fuel economy, at 19kpl, isn't too bad for an 850cc triple. More information on www.xsr900-abarth.eu

2017 Suzuki GSX250R unveiled, looks a bit dated, ordinary, boring...

image host image host
image host image host
image host image host image host image host image host
It seems that Suzuki didn't take the Honda CBR250RR into account while designing the 2017 GSX250R, which looks about 5-6 years old already. It's just not exciting enough

Finally staking their claim in the quarter-litre sportsbike class, Suzuki recently unveiled the 2017 GSX250R at the EICMA, in Milan. The bike is powered by a Euro 4-compliant 248cc parallel-twin that produces 25bhp and 23Nm of torque, while the bike itself weighs 181 kilos (kerb weight). According to Suzuki, the engine has been optimised for low- and mid-range torque and delivers a class-leading 32.5kpl in terms of fuel economy, which means the baby-GSX-R can be ridden for up to 480km on one full tank of fuel.

The Suzuki GSX250R delivers its best performance between 20-90kph, which Suzuki claim is the range that's used most often by most riders. The bike's lightweight two-into-one exhaust system has been designed for maximum efficiency and reduced emissions, while still producing "a pleasing sound." The GSX250R gets a multi-function LCD instrument panel, LED taillamp, Bosch ABS, KYB suspension components, 10-spoke 17-inch alloy wheels, clip-on handlebars and a riding position that's sporty, without being too extreme or track-oriented.

When it reaches Suzuki showrooms next year, the GSX250R will be available in white, black and blue colours. We think the bike looks a bit ordinary, though. If Suzuki took so much time entering the hotly-contested 250cc sportsbike segment, they should have produced a stunning, cutting-edge machine that blew everyone away. There's competition like Honda's mind-blowing CBR250RR, Yamaha R3, TVS Akula 310 and KTM RC200/390, all of which make the GSX250R look a bit dated and boring. Sorry, Suzuki, this one just doesn't work for us...

Friday, November 18, 2016

Yamaha T7 concept provides a preview of Yamaha's all-new mid-size off-roader which will be launched in 2018

image host image host
image host image host
image host image host image host image host image host
Existing mid-size adventure bikes are too soft for you? An all-new off-road machine from Yamaha, based on the T7 and to be launched in 2018, should take care of that

Yamaha recently unveiled the T7 concept at EICMA, in Milan. The bike pays tribute to the early-1980s Yamaha XT600Z Ténéré, which was based on Yamaha's factory Paris-Dakar Rally racebikes that were ridden by Stéphane Peterhansel and other legendary riders. The XTZ600 was a big success for Yamaha back then, with the company selling more than 60,000 units between 1984-1984. And now, the spirit of that original Ténéré is back with the new T7 concept.

According to Yamaha, the T7 represents the ideal mid-size long-distance off-road motorcycle and addresses the concern that other existing mid-size 'adventure' bikes are actually too street-oriented, are too high-tech and aren't actually suited to hard-core off-road use. "The adventure world needs a new kind of motorcycle that can offer the genuine long distance versatility and pure durability of the original Ténéré, combined with contemporary design plus cutting edge engine and chassis technology," says a press note from Yamaha. "A team composed of Yamaha's engineers, designers and product planners from the Official Rally Team in France, the R&D in Italy and GK Design in the Netherlands have developed the new T7 concept. Each member of the team is driven by a desire to create something that would fit the needs of the adventure traveller and represent the Yamaha vision for the next generation of adventure bikes," it adds.

While the Yamaha T7 isn't a production-spec machine, it's a fully functioning prototype and, according to the company, has been developed to "achieve a perfect balance between road and off road capability." It's powered by Yamaha's 700cc parallel-twin and gets an all-new off-road-oriented chassis, along with an aluminium fuel tank, 4-projector LED headlight, carbonfibre fairing and skid plate, custom-made Akrapovič exhaust and high-spec, long-travel KYB suspension.

Thursday, November 17, 2016

2017 Suzuki V-Strom 250 shows that small can indeed be beautiful

image host image host
image host image host
image host image host image host image host
The 2017 Suzuki V-Strom 250 has a small... motor. Power output is very modest. But then, it's not the size of the boat, it's the motion of the ocean...

Suzuki recently uveiled the pint-sized Suzuki’s V-Strom 250, at the EICMA in Milan. The V-Strom 250 joins its bigger brothers, the V-Strom 1000 (launched way back in 2002) and the V-Strom 650 (launched in 2004), and looks like a machine that could be fun to ride despite its smaller engine capacity and lower power output. The 'Strom 250's Euro 4-compliant 248cc SOHC parallel-twin produces 25 horsepower and 23Nm of torque, which sounds a bit miserly but should feel okay on the road, in the real world. And given its sport-touring mission in life, the baby Strom is fitted with an all-new windscreen for optimum weather protection, side case mounts, a 12V DC power outlet, large aluminum rear carrier (8.5kg capacity), reverse-lit full-LCD instrument panel, LED tail lights and 10-spoke alloy wheels. Bosch ABS is standard fitment.

The V-Strom 250's engine has been optimised to deliver peak efficiency in the 20-90kph range, which is where most riders are likely to spend most of their time when riding this machine. Suzuki have worked hard to reduce NVH and deliver a smooth, pleasant ride. Colours include black, yellow and red, and the bike is expected to be in Suzuki showrooms early next year. Pricing will be announced by Suzuki closer to the bike's launch.

Labels

2WD AC Schnitzer AJS Akrapovic all-wheel-drive Alpinestars AMG Aprilia Ariel Audi Avinton Bajaj Barry Sheene Benelli Bianchi Bimota BMW Bosch Brammo Brembo Britten BSA Buell Bultaco Cagiva Campagna Can-Am Carver Casey Stoner Caterham Chinese bikes Classics Concept Bike Confederate CRandS Custom-built Dainese Derbi Diesel Ducati Eddie Lawson EICMA 2008 EICMA 2009 EICMA 2012 EICMA 2013 EICMA 2014 EICMA 2015 EICMA 2016 Electric Ferrari Fischer flying machines Freddie Spencer Giacomo Agostini Gilera Harley-Davidson Helmets Henderson Hero Motocorp Hesketh Honda Horex Husqvarna Hybrid Hyosung Ilmor Indian Intermot 2012 Intermot 2014 Intermot 2016 Interviews Isle of Man TT Jawa Jay Leno Jeremy Burgess Kawasaki Kevin Schwantz KTM Lamborghini Lambretta Laverda Lazareth Lotus Mahindra Malaguti Markus Hofmann McLaren Mercedes-Benz Mick Doohan Midual Millepercento Mission Motors Mondial Morbidelli Morgan Moriwaki Moto Guzzi Moto Morini Moto2 Moto3 MotoCzysz MotoGP MotoGP-2007 MotoGP-2008 MotoGP-2009 MotoGP-2010 Motorcycle Design Motus MTT MV Agusta MZ News Nissan Norton NSU Peraves Petronas Peugeot Photography Piaggio Porsche Quad Renard Renault Riding Impressions Roehr Ronax Ronin Rotary Royal Enfield Scooters Segway Shootouts Short Films Skills Specials stunt riding Supercharged Suter Suzuki Toyota Travel trike Triumph Turbo TVS Two-stroke Ural V10 V12 V4 V6 V8 Valentino Rossi Velocette Vespa Victory Vincent Volkswagen Voxan Vyrus Wakan Wayne Gardner Wayne Rainey Wunderlich Yamaha Yoshimura Zagato