Thursday, June 05, 2008

Tiff of the Twins : KTM RC8 vs Ducati 1098 vs Buell 1125R


Buell 1125R vs KTM RC8 vs Ducati 1098!
Pics: Moto Revue / Jacques Clipet

Moto Revue recently pitted three twin-cylinder sportsbikes – KTM RC8 1190, Ducati 1098 and Buell 1125R – against each other, and while you’ll have to buy the mag for the full story, here are a few quick impressions.

The Ducati 1098, with its hard saddle, stiff suspension and very racer-centric ergonomics, is the least comfortable of the three bikes here. The RC8, with its adjustable ergos, and the 1125R, with its softer suspension, are more suited for longer journeys.


The KTM runs it close, but we think the 1098 still looks the best...

The RC8 steers very precisely, while the 1098, more physical to ride, feels more rigid and stable. Compared to the other two, the Buell feels less confidence-inspiring in the curves. The 1125R also displays inconsistent fit and finish, and build quality is poor for some parts.

Of course, the Buell is also the cheapest of the three bikes here, retailing at 12,695 euros, while the KTM is available for 16,250 euros and the Ducati for 17,350 euros.

The Fight Club:
Caterham R500 vs Ducati Hypermotard. Awesome!
KTM 125 GP racer vs Suzuki GSX-R1000...
1989 Yamaha FZR750RR OW01 vs 2008 R1...
Ducati 1098 vs Lamborghini Gallardo...
Kawasaki ZZR1100 vs ZZR1400!
Ducati 1098 vs 848
BMW R1200GS Adventure vs KTM 990 Adventure
World's fastest bike vs the world's fastest man!
KTM RC8 vs Yamaha R1...

External links:
Yamaha FZ1 picture gallery...
Monster Kawasaki busts out...
A car for MV Agusta F4 CC owners...

2009 Yamaha V-Max: Specs, first official pics and video


With its 200bhp V4, the 2009 V-Max should be quite all right...

The first Yamaha V-Max came out in 1985, when Yamaha took a 1,198cc, 140bhp V4 and made a big, bad, bruiser-cruiser out of it. Now, more than twenty years on, Mr Max is back in his new avatar – the 2009 Yamaha V-Max. We’ve already shown you the first ‘leaked’ pics of this bike last week, and now we have the full spec on the new V-Max from Yamaha.

Yamaha say the primary goals for the V-Max project team were awesome acceleration and strong engine performance, precise and sharp handling, unique styling and Euro III compliance. The result is a 310-kilo motorcycle fitted with a 1,697cc V4 that makes 200 horsepower at 9,000rpm and 166.8Nm of torque at 6,500rpm.

The new V-Max is loaded with electronics. There’s Yamaha’s GENICH technology for starters. That’s Genesis in Electronic engineering aimed at New, Innovative Control technology based on Human sensibilities. Er, yeah… well. Moving on, there’s also Yamaha Chip Controlled Intake (YCC-I) and Yamaha Chip Controlled Throttle (YCC-T), which play a key role in extracting 200bhp from that 65-degree V4.

Mr Max rides on 18-inch wheels, and rear tyre size is a truly manly 200/50 R18. The chassis is an all-new ‘diamond-type’ unit made of aluminium. It’s a strong, lightweight structure that’s made of gravity-cast, CF die-cast and extruded aluminium sections. The design incorporates gravity-cast components for the main frame and pivot assembly, while the rear frame is made from a range of Yamaha’s exclusive CF die-cast parts and extruded parts which are welded together.

This combination of different types of aluminium, each with a different rigidity level, is one of the major factors in achieving the overall desired balance of rigidity. And to enhance that balance even further, the V4 engine is incorporated as a stressed member – using cast-iron mounts at the front, the centre of the V bank, and at the top and bottom of the crankcase.


Now that Mr Max is back, other super-nakeds must be shivering in their boots

The V-Max’s front fork has 52mm downtubes, and their oxidized titanium coating ensures better surface hardness and stiction-free operation. The fork is fully adjustable for preload, as well as rebound and compression damping. Rear suspension is link-type Monocross, with the rear shock being fully adjustable for preload, and compression and rebound damping. All settings are remote adjustable.

Front brakes are dual 320mm wave-type discs, gripped by radial-mount 6-piston calipers. Rear brake is a 298mm wave-type disc gripped by a pin-slide type single-piston caliper. The V-Max also gets Yamaha’s latest linear-controlled ABS system, which prevents wheels from locking up under hard braking and provides consistent braking over all types of road surfaces.

The 2009 Yamaha V-Max is limited to an electronically governed 220km/h top speed, though we’re sure aftermarket experts will have something to say about that. And, of course, after you’ve unlocked the full potential of that 200bhp V4, there’ll be the turbos and the superchargers and the NOS systems…

The V-Max will cost about US$18,000 and only 2,500 units of the bike will be made this year. For more details, and to order your own V-Max, visit the official website here


The 2009 Yamaha V-Max promo video!
And h
ere's some pics of customised V-Max bikes. It's back to the 1980s then...



Pics: Moto Tuning

Also see:
An orange-and-black, 180bhp ZX-10R, anyone...?
Suzuki: A glimpse of the non-GSX-R future...
Italian Adventure: The Moto Morini Granpasso 1200...
GG Quadster: The Quadzilla Returns!
The best race-replica Fireblade ever...
Going Green: A biofuel-powered GSX-R!
American Beef: The supercharged, 180bhp Roehr 1250sc
Big CC Racing's 450bhp Suzuki B-King
Heron Suzuki GB Replica GSX-R1100...
Honda CB1000R first ride video...

External links:
2009 Yamaha V-Max picture gallery...


...and for those who're looking at buying their first Yamaha, here's the brand-new YZF R15, which is being launched in India on the 12th of June. Looks good to us...

Tuesday, June 03, 2008

Valentino Rossi: “Ferrari wanted me…”


Rossi vs Schumacher. It wasn't to be...

According to a report on Crash.net, The Doctor says that Ferrari wanted him to join their F1 team, and while he did consider switching sports, he finally did not go simply because he enjoyed racing motorcycles too much…

Rossi, who won five successive MotoGP world titles from 2001 to 2005, tested for Ferrari in 2006 at Valencia, and his lap times there were just one second adrift of Michael Schumacher’s time. Ironically, while Rossi chose to stick with bikes, it’s Schumacher who’s now racing motorcycles!

‘I thought about it. Ferrari wanted me. It is another world, but I was fast. There was a possibility of moving to F1. I don't know whether I would have done well or not, but in the end I enjoy my life and still have the passion for motorcycles,’ says Rossi, speaking about his decision to stay with motorcycle racing. And thank god for that, because MotoGP would definitely be duller with The Doctor’s sparkling presence…

Also see:
2008 MotoGP race reports and hi-res wallpaper
Yamaha brings back Mr Max...
The Moto Morini Granpasso: More pics and details...
Deus Ex Machina: The wearable motorcycle!
Brit bikers want Mrs Brad Pitt...
Awesome video: Caterham R500 vs Ducati Hypermotard...
Daniese and AGV launch Agostini-replica helmet...
Born in the USA: The supercharged, 180bhp Roehr 1250sc
Fancy an orange-and-black, 180bhp Kawasaki ZX-10R...?

UDO: Twisted Trikes’ FireBlade-powered three-wheeler


Honda Fireblade engine + three wheels = loads of fun!

Pics: Twisted Trikes

Here’s yet another three-wheeler that should be loads of fun. Created by Twisted Trikes, the UDO (unidentified driving object) package consists of a 954 model Honda CBR900RR engine, six-speed sequential-shift gearbox, three wheels, custom-made chassis, adjustable coil-over-shock front suspension, rack and pinion steering, and Momo F1-type steering wheel.

The UDO weighs about 290 kilos and while no performance figures are available, the thing should accelerate harder than most sportscars and hit a top speed of about 240km/h. Sounds like our kind of fun…

For more details, visit the Twisted Trikes website here

Street stunt riding world champions...


Forget Chris Pfeiffer, these guys are the real stunt riding world champs!
Video: Oliepeil

More stunt monkeys:
Ok, girls can ride quads...
Motocross bikes vs Monster trucks?
Chris Pfeiffer: Stunt-riding the BMW HP2 Megamoto!
Motorcycling + BMX + Skateboarding + Stunt riding = This!
2007 World Stunt Riding Championship...
Robbie Knievel jumps 24 trucks...

MCN: Bimota DB7 first ride


The Bimota DB7 needs some 'hot poop' tyres according to MCN...
Pic: MCN

Somehow, their bikes never turn out to be as good as they should be – the whole is always less than the sum of its parts – but we still have a soft spot for Bimota. They are one of the very few companies left that still make motorcycles for the love of it. (Well, that's what we like to think anyway...)

The latest in the line of Bimotas that should be absolutely, world-beatingly glorious, but aren’t, is the DB7. MCN’s Michael Neeves recently got to ride a DB7 at the Misano circuit in Italy, and here’s what he has to say about the machine:

‘It’s surprisingly roomy given how small it looks. The brakes are superb and the engine has got more mid-range power than the Ducati 1098 thanks to Bimota’s new fuel injection and exhaust system. There is a ‘but’ though. For a bike like this, with high quality suspension, if it’s not set up specifically for the rider, it can be awkward to ride. This is definitely the case here. The steering is slow and heavy, and stability in the corners is not great because of the too soft rear suspension. But even with these problems, the bike is light and agile.’

‘The Continental tyres are appalling. They have very low grip at the rear and zero feel at the front. If I was paying over £21,000 for a bike I’d expect the latest hot poop tyres,’ says Neeves. Hmm… so we suppose once you’ve got those Contis off the bike and put on some ‘hot poop' tyres, the DB7 should be quite all right. Now all we have to do is find those £21,000…

Also see:
Motociclismo: Bimota DB7 road test...
Memorable: The two-stroke Bimota V-Due
Road test video: Bimota DB6R...
The very, very fast Bimota YB11...
Racy reptile: The Bimota YB6 Tuatara!
Memorable: The Bimota DB2

External links:
Bimota DB7 picture gallery...
Cool custom: Harley-Davidson GB1200R
A garage with 1990s Yamaha YZR500s in it...

Monday, June 02, 2008

Paul Foster's 180bhp, WSBK-replica Kawasaki ZX-10R


Fancy an orange-and-black, 180bhp ZX-10R? We do...

Pics: London Bikers

We found Paul Foster’s 2006 WSBK-replica Kawasaki ZX-10R on London Bikers, and we think the bike quite rocks! Apart from the orange-and-black paintjob, Foster’s ZX-10R has been fitted with an Arrow titanium race exhaust system, aftermarket screen and hugger, wavy brake discs from ISR, Maxton suspension (GP25 fork internal cartridge kit and GP7 rear shock), and a top-mount steering damper from GPR.

The bike also has nine-spoke wheels from Talon, Goodridge brake hoses, Avon Viper Xtreme 190/55 tyres, Dynojet Power Commander III + LCD Display and PK-Power quickshifter. And, oh, the Kawasaki engines makes 180bhp (presumably at the rear wheel!) courtesy an engine tune from Team RHR. Yes, yes, we like your bike Mr Foster…!

Also see:
Tokyo Joe's MotoGP-replica GSX-R1000...
Race-replica Fireblades: Which is the best...?
Sheene-replica Suzuki RG500...
Biaggi-replica Yamaha RD500!
Sheene tribute, Vermeulen-replica Suzuki GSX-R1000...
The best Rossi-replica NSR500 in the world...


They figured out a way to make the bike look even hotter!
Pic: Fast Bikes

Suzuki Crosscage: Riding the future...


The fuel cell-powered Suzuki Crosscage. Someday, we may all be riding bikes like this...

Pics: Motociclismo

Electric vehicles and fuel cell-powered motorcycles – that’s one vision of what the future’s probably coming to. And Suzuki are already off the block, with the hydrogen fuel cell-powered Crosscage. That’s right, within a year or two the Crosscage may be the first hydrogen fuel cell production motorcycle to come out of Japan, or indeed, anywhere else.

With its hydrogen fuel cell powerplant developed by British company Intelligent Energy, the Suzuki Crosscage is not production ready yet, but prototypes are already being tested in Japan, where, apparently, some journalists recently had a chance to take the bike out for a spin.

The Crosscage features an X-shaped chassis made of aluminium and steel, and instead of your usual petrol engine, there’s a fuel cell, hydrogen tank and lithium ion battery that provide propulsion here. According to a first ride report on Motociclismo, the bike weighs about 140 kilos, and with the equivalent of about 8 horsepower from its fuel cell, the Crosscage’s performance is said to be similar to that of a conventional 125cc machine.

The ’Cage rides on 17-inch wheels and feels very slim and agile on the move. Of course, the most striking thing about the Crosscage is the absolute lack of mechanical noise when the bike is running…

The Suzuki Crosscage features fully digital instrumentation, single-side front and rear suspension, single 265mm brake discs on both wheels, and… er, LEDs attached to the wheel spokes. Range is 200km, after which the bike has to be filled up with hydrogen… or recharged with electricity, or whatever.

Will the Suzuki Crosscage take over from the Suzuki GSX-R1000 someday? We hope that never happens. But if it ever does, you’ll be reading about it on Faster and Faster

Also see:
Flight of fancy: Kawasaki ZX-8R and Honda CX750 Turbo...
Face-off: KTM RC8 vs Yamaha R1!
Malaguti MR250: Return of the two-stroke motorcycle?
Here's one GSX-R we'd love to own!
Retro-cool: The Moto Guzzi V7 Classic...
Tough enough for Speedway?
Fireblade evolution: 1992 CBR900RR vs 2008 CBR1000RR!
Honda: 2010 and beyond...

Italian MotoGP: Race results from Mugello


Valentino Rossi celebrates his win at the 2008 Italian MotoGP at Mugello!

Stoner took second place behind Rossi, Pedrosa was in third and de Angelis in fourth place. Scroll down for more hi-res pics...

2008 Italian MotoGP race results:
1. Valentino Rossi ITA Fiat Yamaha Team (B) 42min 31.153 secs
2. Casey Stoner AUS Ducati Marlboro Team (B) 42min 33.354 secs
3. Dani Pedrosa SPA Repsol Honda Team (M) 42min 36.020 secs
4. Alex de Angelis RSM San Carlo Honda Gresini (B) 42min 37.466 secs
5. Colin Edwards USA Tech 3 Yamaha (M) 42min 43.683 secs
6. James Toseland GBR Tech 3 Yamaha (M) 42min 44.959 secs
7. Loris Capirossi ITA Rizla Suzuki MotoGP (B) 42min 45.600 secs
8. Andrea Dovizioso ITA JiR Team Scot MotoGP (M) 42min 46.472 secs
9. Shinya Nakano JPN San Carlo Honda Gresini (B) 42min 46.480 secs
10. Chris Vermeulen AUS Rizla Suzuki MotoGP (B) 43min 1.938 secs
11. Sylvain Guintoli FRA Alice Team (B) 43min 10.774 secs
12. Toni Elias SPA Alice Team (B) 43min 21.174 secs
13. Nicky Hayden USA Repsol Honda Team (M) 43min 21.593 secs
14. Tady Okada JPN Repsol Honda Team (M) 43min 30.002 secs
15. Anthony West AUS Kawasaki Racing Team (B) 43min 31.889 secs

DNF:
Randy de Puniet FRA LCR Honda MotoGP (M) 9min 25.989 secs
Marco Melandri ITA Ducati Marlboro Team (B) 9min 26.358 secs
John Hopkins USA Kawasaki Racing Team (B) 11min 17.629 secs
Jorge Lorenzo SPA Fiat Yamaha Team (M) 11min 11.489 secs

Full race report here

Here's a BIG collection of hi-res wallpaper from the 2008 Italian MotoGP and some other MotoGP races of this season. Enjoy...!







Also see:
Hi-res MotoGP wallpaper: Even more pics from the 2008 season...
Davide Brivio: Jorge Lorenzo is dangerous...
Nicky Hayden defends his performance...
Valentino Rossi: 30 years, 7 world titles and a few regrets...
Aprilia working on MotoGP comeback...
Valentino Rossi: "The first time..."
Colin Edwards thinks Yamaha's 2008 MotoGP comeback is because of him!

Share It