Tuesday, August 19, 2008

BMW K1200S-based EML Speed 2000 sidecar rig


The BMW K1200S-based EML Speed 2000. Very cool, we think...

Pics: Motomag

This very interesting looking BMW sidecar rig comes from Motomag, who apparently got to ride the thing recently. Called the EML Speed 2000, the three-wheeler is fitted with the BMW K1200S’s liquid-cooled, 16-valve, DOHC four-cylinder engine, which has been limited to 106 horsepower and 130Nm of torque. The gearbox is the standard six-speed unit.

According to Motomag, the BMW engine feels strong on expressways despite the excess weight of the sidecar rig (the whole things weighs 458kg dry). The engine never seems to lack flexibility or torque and the gearbox is always quick and precise. The suspension on the other hand is a bit soft, and the trike wallows a fair bit, especially at higher speeds. At least the brakes work very well…

Getting in and out of the EML Speed 2000 is easy, and the vehicle is comfortable as a large-ish tourer. The fit and finish is top-notch and apart from the suspension, which spoils the whole experience a bit, this is one trike that’s great fun to ride. But yes, at around 32,000 euros, it’s also very expensive…

Full test on Motomag here


Visit the EML website for details on their complete range of sidecar outfits

Also see:
A three-wheeled Hayabusa, anyone?
AC Schnitzer get their hands on the BMW F800GS...
2009 Harley-Davidson V-Rod Muscle...
V8-powered Sabertooth WildCat launched...
Bandito: Hannigan Motorsports’ Kawasaki ZX-14 sidecar...
Rotohak: The 325bhp BMW sidecar that… isn’t one!
The coolest trikes on Faster and Faster...

External links:
'Boobs on Bikes' parade in New Zealand: Story and pics!
The rise of the rich urban biker...
Non-pneumatic tyres for motorcycles...?
MasterBike 2008: The final round...

Suzuki unveil new Intruder C1800RT


The new Suzuki Intruder C1800RT long-distance cruiser...

Suzuki have unveiled their new long-distance cruiser, the Intruder C1800RT. Powered by the fuel-injected, liquid-cooled, 1783cc DOHC v-twin from the M1800R (which, we suppose, is a short-distance cruiser?), the C1800RT also features a large windshield, saddlebags, passenger backrest, pullback handlebars and floorboards.

Weighing in at 357 kilos dry, the Suzuki Intruder C1800RT gets a five-speed gearbox, and rides on 16-inch wheels, wearing 150/80 (front) and 240/55 (rear) rubber. For more details, visit the Suzuki website here

Also see:
Kawasaki Z1300: Old school muscle...
Bimota DB7: The Black Edition...
The quickest Kaw ZX-12R in the world...!
A three-wheeled Hayabusa, anyone?
A Chinese-made Dodge Tomahawk rip-off...!
Harley XR1200 riding impression...
2008 LA Calendar Motorcycle Show

External links:
A Jaguar bike? Really...?
2008 Unity Ride picture gallery...

Sunday, August 17, 2008

Czech Republic Grand Prix: Race results from Brno


The Doctor won the Czech GP, while Stoner crashed out of the race. Looks like Rossi will, after all, win his 6th MotoGP world championship this year...!



2008 Czech Republic MotoGP: Race results from Brno

1. Valentino Rossi ITA Fiat Yamaha Team (B) 43min 28.841 secs
2. Toni Elias SPA Alice Team (B) 43min 43.845 secs
3. Loris Capirossi ITA Rizla Suzuki MotoGP (B) 43min 50.530 secs
4. Shinya Nakano JPN San Carlo Honda Gresini (B) 43min 54.700 secs
5. Anthony West AUS Kawasaki Racing Team (B) 43min 58.306 secs
6. Chris Vermeulen AUS Rizla Suzuki MotoGP (B) 43min 59.449 secs
7. Marco Melandri ITA Ducati Marlboro Team (B) 44min 5.294 secs
8. Alex de Angelis RSM San Carlo Honda Gresini (B) 44min 5.591 secs
9. Andrea Dovizioso ITA JiR Team Scot MotoGP (M) 44min 7.663 secs
10. Jorge Lorenzo SPA Fiat Yamaha Team (M) 44min 8.414 secs
11. John Hopkins USA Kawasaki Racing Team (B) 44min 8.451 secs
12. Sylvain Guintoli FRA Alice Team (B) 44min 9.733 secs
13. James Toseland GBR Tech 3 Yamaha (M) 44min 40.331 secs
14. Colin Edwards USA Tech 3 Yamaha (M) 44min 49.974 secs
15. Dani Pedrosa SPA Repsol Honda Team (M) 45min 5.879 secs
16. Randy de Puniet FRA LCR Honda MotoGP (M) 45min 7.248 secs

DNF:

Casey Stoner
AUS Ducati Marlboro Team (B)

Detailed race report here

More pics from various races, from the 2008 MotoGP season



Also see:
Hi-res 2008 MotoGP wallpaper...
The HOTTEST Rossi-replica NSR500 ever...
MotoGP-replica Suzuki GSX-R1000...
Valentino Rossi: "The first time..."
Dainese and AGV's Agostini-replica helmet...
Race-replica Fireblades: Which one is the best...?
Battle of the Brits: Carl Fogarty vs James Toseland!
Moriwaki's 600cc MotoGP racer for 2011...

External links:
David Emmett's take on the Czech GP...
MotoGP: Who's going where in 2009...
Legendary Hondas on sale: RC45, NR750 and many others!!

Chinese company starts exporting hydrogen fuel-cell powered mopeds!


Yeah, it looks totally insignificant, but it's powered by a hydrogen fuel-cell. The future of motorcycling just might begin here...

While the world waits for Suzuki to put their hydrogen fuel-cell powered Crosscage into production, China has already started making – and even exporting – hydrogen fuel-cell powered mopeds.

According to a report on Shanghai Daily, a Chinese company, Shanghai Pearl Hydrogen Power Resource Technology has been exporting fuel-cell mopeds since May this year. The company has, till now, sent 30 of these two-wheelers to England, Spain and the United States.

Fuel-cell bikes use hydrogen to generate electricity, which in turn powers an electric motor which drives the bike. Shanghai Pearl’s fuel-cell bikes can travel about 75km on a full tank of fuel – that’s about 50gm of hydrogen. Tanking up on hydrogen takes 20 minutes and costs about US$0.30.

Shanghai Pearl hopes to find a market for its fuel-cell bikes in the US, Canada and Europe, particularly Germany, France and Italy. In Spain, the company’s bikes were sold at the equivalent of US$2,900 though it’s confident that the price can be brought down by around US$600. SP produced 100 units of its hydrogen bike this year, and hopes to expand capacity to 1,000 units by 2011.

Another Chinese company, Shanghai Shen-Li High-Tech, also makes various hydrogen fuel-cell powered passenger cars and city buses, which are already in use in China. The company has even supplied several fuel-cell buses for the ongoing Beijing Olympics.

While Japanese and European manufacturers have dominated the world of motorcycles in the petrol engine era, it seems the Chinese are already getting ahead of everyone else when it comes to the next step in motorcycle evolution – hydrogen fuel-cell powered bikes.

Rudy Kurth and the 1976 Cat III


This 1970s CAT III has got to be one of the most amazing trikes ever made...

Pics: Jalopnik

We found this rather radical looking machine on the pages of Jalopnik. Built by Swiss engineer Rudy Kurth, back in 1976, the Cat III is essentially a sidecar rig fitted with a custom-built 500cc three-cylinder engine.

Weighing in at around 139kg, the CAT III is built around an extruded aluminum spine, which also serves as the fuel tank. The 500cc three-cylinder engine is quite complex – it’s based on two 350cc Honda twin-cylinder engines. Mr Kurth, probably a talented engineer, used three of the four Honda cylinders to make his own 500cc triple.


Should be an amazing ride, eh...?

The other notable thing about the CAT is that both the front and the side wheels are steered, with the latter turning in proportion to the tracking effect. (Er… no, even we don’t know what that means, but it probably, somehow, adds to the vehicle’s stability and handling prowess.) The CAT III is fitted with tyres designed for the Tyrell P34 six-wheeled Formula One car.

Unfortunately enough, we’re unable to find more details on this very interesting machine. Perhaps one of our readers can help? If you have any more information on the CAT III, please post the same in the comments section below. Thank you!

Also see:
Harley-powered trike: The Cirbin V13R
The very, very cool Carver One...
Tiff Needell tests the amazing Campagna T-Rex!
The Peraves MonoTracer: 100 units in 2009...
Riding the Travertson V-Rex...
The 750bhp, 600km/h Acabion GTBO 70...
Memorable: The Bimota YB11...

External links:
MAG: Matúš Procháczka's trike concept...

Saturday, August 16, 2008

A three-wheeled Hayabusa...?


That's Nick Dagostino with his three-wheeled Hayabusa...

Pics: Super Streetbike

What would you do if all your mates had a Hayabusa, and you wanted yours to stand out in the crowd? Nick Dagostino decided to add a third wheel to his 2003 Hayabusa. Now, he says, he has no problems finding his bike – it’s the one with a crowd always gathered around it…

Speaking to Super Streetbike, Dagostino, a resident of Saratoga Springs, New York, says, ‘I did all the usual stuff. Chromed the gas tank, polished everything else, lowered the bike, stretched it seven inches… but everywhere I went out here, I saw 10 more that looked exactly like mine! I hate being in the mainstream – I always want to have something different from the rest. So I went home one night and, halfway into a 12-pack, I thought what the hell can I do that no one's ever done before. This is what I came up with.’

Dagostino’s 2003 Hayabusa has been fitted with a super-trick tandem swingarm, which allows the fitment of a third wheels on the bike. ‘I love it. It's so stealth. Coming at you straight on, it looks like any other ’Busa, but once guys see the third wheel, everything changes. It's so much fun to watch them do a double take and grab their buddies,’ says Dagostino.

The extra-long swingarm has been built by Myrtle West Cycle in Longs, South Carolina. It is more than four feet long and features extra underbracing to ensure strength and stability. Of course, only the centre wheel is driven – the rear wheel is fitted with a dummy sprocket with its teeth machined off. For now, Dagostino says driving both rear wheels would be too complex, though even that might happen in the future.

Surprisingly enough, Dagostino rides his three-wheeled Hayabusa regularly. ‘It tracks pretty well. The only place you really feel the extra wheel is on hard, 90-degree turns. The second wheel will scrub a little bit, but you know when this is going to happen so you can deal with it pretty easily,’ he says. Just as well then that the man makes his living driving a truck for the New York highway department, and has sufficient practice with tandem-wheeled vehicles…

Other trick bits on the Hayabusa include a five-inch LCD colour monitor – which is connected to a rear-view camera fitted below the tail-lamp – on top of the fuel tank, and an HMF high-mount dual-pipe exhaust system. We’re not too sure if we’d really want a three-wheeled Hayabusa, but for those who have trouble finding their bike in parking lots, something like Dagostino’s bike might just help.

More details on this bike on the Super Streetbike website here

Also see:
The coolest trikes in the world...
Hi-res wallpaper from the 2008 MotoGP season...
The amazing Yamaha Tesseract...
Memorable: The Morbidelli 850 V8
Face-off: Yamaha V-Max vs Suzuki B-King!
Bimota Tesi 3D riding impression...
Bandito: Hannigan Motorsports’ Kawasaki ZX-14 sidecar...

External links:
So you always wanted a 500cc GP racebike for the street...?
Classic: Husqvarna Automatic for Swedish army...
Some of the coolest toys ever...
A site for chopper fans...