Monday, December 08, 2008

MTT Turbine Streetfighter: The 420 horsepower, US$175,000 rocket-bike


The MTT Turbine Streetfighter. Simply awesome...

Pics: MTT / Flickr

Based in South Louisiana, in the US and headed by Ted McIntyre II, MTT are turbine engine specialists. According to a note on the company’s website, ‘MTT is made up of the world's most experienced professionals in the turbine engine industry, having completed more diverse, custom turbine engine installations than any other company in the world.’

The best part is, the guys at MTT seem to be putting their expertise to damn good use, by building turbine-engined two-wheeled rocketships. A few years ago, the company had made the MTT Y2K Turbine Superbike, which was powered by a Rolls Royce-Allison turbine that made 320 horsepower and 576Nm of torque. The bike’s top speed was in excess of 400km/h…

So, since a 320bhp bike that can do 400km/h simply isn’t adequate for everybody, MTT are now ready with their next bike – the Turbine Streetfighter. The MTT Streetfighter’s Rolls Royce-Allison turbine now pumps out as much as 420bhp and 680Nm of torque. Other changes over the Y2K Superbike include a bigger swingarm, Pirelli Diablo 240-section rear tyre, increased fuel capacity and an enhanced cooling system.

The MTT Turbine Streetfighter is also fitted with a full carbonfibre fairing, 17-inch carbonfibre wheels, tubular aluminium alloy frame, a rear-mounted camera with LCD color display, computerized ignition and two-speed automatic transmission. Suspension components comprise of a 55mm USD fork and oleo-pneumatic, fully adjustable monoshock from Ohlins. Brakes are Brembo units, with 320mm discs all around. The bike runs on either diesel or kerosense (!), and has a 34-litre fuel tank.

As you would expect, the Streetfighter isn’t exactly inexpensive. The turbine-engined bike sells for US$175,000 and once you’ve placed an order, you’ll need to wait for 12 weeks before you get your hands on your jet bike. Then again, you can get your bike in whatever colour you want and design your own graphics etc. if you wish…

It may not be the most practical thing in the world – a Hayabusa or a ZZR1400 is usually plenty fast for most people – but owning a jet-engined bike has got to be the stuff of dreams for bike-mad speed junkies. Imagine the look on your neighbours’ faces when you start up your MTT Turbine Streetfighter in the morning, before leaving for office. Ooooohh..., now that would be some trip…!


A Discovery channel video of the MTT Y2K jet-engined bike...


Also see:
Big CC Racing's Kawasaki ZZR1400 Turbo...
Acabion GTBO 70: The fastest bike in the world...
NitroDuke: The world's fastest KTM...
200bhp, NOS'd Suzuki B-King...
Larry McBride: "GSX-Rs are for moped riders!"
MAB's turbocharged BMW K1200R...
Ducati SuperSport Turbo dragbike...
Fearsome: Yamaha TZ750 dirt-tracker...

Elsewhere today:
The HOTTEST Yamaha RD250LC ever...!
The shape shifting R-Bike. Cool, or just plain silly...?

Sunday, December 07, 2008

Memorable: Graeme Crosby and his bikes…


Graeme Crosby finished second in the 500cc world championship in 1982

Pics: Highsider

Now 53 years old, Graeme Crosby was one of the most versatile and accomplished motorcycle grand prix racers of his time. Born in New Zealand in 1955, Crosby went on to race around the world, winning the Daytona 200, Imola 200 and the Suzuka 8 Hours races. He also raced at the Isle of Man, winning the Senior TT in 1980.

Crosby ultimately went on to race in the 500cc class, racing with Suzuki on an RG500 in 1980 and 1981. He finished eighth in the 500cc world championship in 1980, and fifth in 1981, also winning the British TT F1 championship in the same year.

Crosby moved to Yamaha for the 1982 season, and finished second in the 500cc world championship that year, behind Franco Uncini. Crosby retired from motorcycle road racing at the end of 1982, and though he never won a race in the 500cc class, he did take 10 podium finishes between 1980-1982.


Crosby rode in the 500cc class with Suzuki, in 1980 and 81

‘No one ever told Crosby what to do. Croz liked to ride motorcycles insanely fast and he liked a drink. And sometimes, he combined the two, even on the Isle of Man,’ says Mat Oxley, who recently mentioned Graeme in a story he did on maverick motorcycle racers.

‘When he first hit Europe in 1979, the British TT F1 championship was all about mega-trick Honda RCB1000s with lightweight racing frames and aerodynamic bodywork,’ says Oxley. ‘So Croz rocked up at Brands on the rattiest heap of a Moriwaki Z1000 streetbike, and gave Ron Haslam the fright of his life. The fans loved Croz, and a legend was born,’ concludes Oxley.


Graeme rode this GSX-R1000 in the parade of champions, at the Isle of Man races in 2007

So what’s the fast Kiwi doing now, you might wonder? Well, he’s still riding – Crosby rode a GSX-R1000 in the parade of champions during the Isle of Man races last year. And he seems to have kept up with technology, so he even has a website. Among other things on his site, Crosby talks about some of the bikes he’s raced in the past, and here are some excerpts from what he has to say about some of those bikes:


'I loved it. It had style,' says Crosby, about the Kawasaki H1

Kawasaki H1 and H1R

If there was a bike that caused so many broken bones and gravel rash and skin grafts then this is it. Totally responsible for undertakers massive bottom line profit. What a shocker! The engine was a very wide three cylinder, two stroke unit designed by a psychotic Kamikaze teacher. This bike was a bad handler and a real beast to ride.

The engine sat too high, the chassis lacked strength. The brakes were virtually non existent, unless you fitted green linings, and even then it was at best marginal. To tame this monster required balls the size of a hot air balloon and a total disregard for ones own safety. It was hellishly fast and handled like a roller skate in a gravel pit. But I loved it. It had style, it had presence and everyone admired it. Sadly, most of these end their life with crumpled up front ends laying in wrecker’s yards.

The 500 Factory racer version of this beast was a HIR-A and it was the only bike I rode that caused me to break a bone. A collarbone! What a bastard of a bike!

image host

You had to ride the wheels off these things to get them to perform, says Croz

Kawasaki Z1 and Z1R

The best big bike made, ever. This was an engineering feat that put Kawasaki into the big league. Lots of innovative technical refinements with this bike, DOHC, bucket valve gear etc.... a real strong engine that would go like a raped ape and had plenty of horsepower, but at the same time as strong as an oxen.

This bike formed the backbone of four stroke racing for many years. The engine was fitted to various chassis’s and performed really well. I used this base Z1 production bike to win the Castrol 6 Hour race in NZ, which I rode on my own for the full 6 hours. I even stopped for ‘pee’ during re-fuelling at one of the scheduled stops.

We then began modifying the production Z1s and ‘Superbikes’ were born. We used the standard Z1, Z1000, Z1R models and modified the engines and tuned the chassis. We did lots of work on the engine by using Pop Yoshimura’s racing parts to make good amounts of horsepower. We then tried to tame it by slightly modifying the chassis. Bracing it here and there and fitting wider wheels and soft slick tyres.

Then came the fun part – I would throw a leg over it and set off down pit lane not knowing what to expect! Well, we generally got them steering OK but looking back it was still just a modified rode bike that you had to ride the wheels off to get it to perform.


The Yamaha YZR500 OW60, the bike Crosby rode to a second place finish in the 1982 500cc motorcycle grand prix racing world championship

Yamaha OW60

I joined Yamaha with the Agostini Marlboro Team in 1982 and was faced with an extraordinary situation. Kenny Roberts had convinced Yamaha to build the 82 GP bike with unconventional steering geometry. I tested the bike in Japan and was disappointed with its performance.

We decided to make our own modifications and I used Suzuki geometry from the 81 XR35 bike, and it transformed this OW60 into a weapon. An alloy chassis and power valves made it a delight to ride. It had very similar performance to the 82 Suzuki’s but I liked its colour scheme much better!

Anyway, I rode this to a 2nd place in the 500cc World Championship. I felt though it was an intermediate bike made in 82 as a stop gap measurement while waiting for the V4 to be produced.


For more of Graeme Crosby and his bikes, visit his website here

Saturday, December 06, 2008

Ferrari motorcycle coming up for sale, asking price US$300,000


The only real, 'official' Ferrari motorcycle ever made, for a mere US$300,000...

Pics: Bonhams, via MC24

For those who’ve always wanted a Ferrari motorcycle, here’s your chance to get one. Not some crappy backyard bodge job or a vague concept – this is the real thing. It’s the one-off Ferrari motorcycle built by David Kay Engineering and bears frame and engine number SF-O1M. It’s the only real Ferrari motorcycle in the world.

Back in 1990, David Kay wrote to Piero Ferrari (Enzo Ferrari’s son), asking him if he could build a motorcycle that would carry the prancing horse badge, in tribute to the late Enzo. Piero did approve the project and gave David the permission to put a Ferrari badge on his motorcycle.

The bike, which took 3,000 man-hours to build, was completed in 1995. Its 900cc, four-cylinder, DOHC engine is custom-built, and produces 105 horsepower at 8,800rpm – enough to propel the 172-kilo bike to a top speed of 265km/h.

Other bits on this 1995 Ferrari 900 include a tubular steel chassis, aluminium bodywork, custom-built exhaust system, digital instrument panel, Forcelle Italia USD fork, Brembo disc brakes, 17-inch Astralite wheels and twin WPS shock absorbers at the back.

The bike, which has spent most of its life in its owner’s drawing room, is in perfect, mint condition. Bonhams will be auctioning the machine on the 20th of this month, and asking price would be around US$300,000. Now if all your mates are lining up to buy a Ducati Streetfighter S or the MV Agusta Brutale 1078RR, and you want to be one up on them…

More details on the Bonhams website here

Also see:
All bull: When Lamborghini made a motorcycle...
1952: When Ducati made scooters...
The maddest-ever Peugeot-powered motorcycle...
A 2,300cc, V12-powered Kawasaki...
Classic: The Bimota YB6 Tuatara...
Desmosedici RR: For the love of Ducati...
Memorable: The mid-1980s Honda VF1000R...
Heavy Metal: 1964 Bianchi Bicilindrica 500cc GP racer...

Elsewhere today:
Lamborghini are building a bike again...

Thursday, December 04, 2008

Massimo Tamburini to retire from MV Agusta


Massimo Tamburini. The man. The legend...

With bikes like the Ducati 916, MV Agusta F4 and MV Agusta Brutale to his credit, Massimo Tamburini is pretty much the God of motorcycle design. And God, is about to retire. Yes, MV Agusta have announced that their design chief, Massimo Tamburini will retire from the company at the end of this year.

Tamburini has been with Cagiva since 1985 and has headed MV Agusta's engineering and design centre, Centro Ricerche Cagiva, in San Marino, for more than a decade. ‘I have dedicated a significant part of my career in motorcycle design to Cagiva and MV Agusta, and am immensely proud of the beautiful and thrilling motorcycles we have created,’ says Tamburini.

‘While my decision to retire was extremely difficult to make, I am confident the highly-talented designers and engineers in San Marino will continue the tradition of excellence that is the hallmark of MV Agusta. I have been privileged to realize so many dreams during my years with Cagiva and MV Agusta and look forward to seeing more great things yet to come from the company,’ adds the masterful motorcycle designer, a legend in his own lifetime.

‘Massimo Tamburini is one of the legends of the motorcycle industry, and leaves a great legacy at MV Agusta,’ says Claudio Castiglioni, MV Agusta Chairman and Director of Motorcycle Research and Development at the company. ‘The capabilities he built at MV Agusta's design centre are outstanding, and his legacy and vision will now be carried forward by the team he assembled and mentored over many years. While we will miss his presence, we respect his decision to retire and wish him all the best for the future,’ he adds.

It is not clear whether Massimo Tamburini will continue to design motorcycles – perhaps for another motorcycle manufacturer or maybe as an independent designer – though he says he will now pursue other interests outside of design.


The MV Agusta F4 Tamburini - the most beautiful motorcycle in the world...

Also see:
Pierre Terblanche: “I thought that the 916 series needed to move on…”
Lamborghini Design 90: It was all bull...
Noré Sébastien: Motorcycle magic with an airbrush...
Memorable: The Moriwaki Dream Fighter...
Fifteen years of the Honda Fireblade...
Ecosse ES1 engineer wins design award...
The hottest Kawasaki ZX-10R ever...

Elsewhere today:
In conversation with Matt Levatich, the man in charge of MV Agusta...
Death Zone: Riding to Chernobyl...

Wednesday, December 03, 2008

Funny Front: Tier Motorsports’ Yamaha R1 concept


Fork off: Tier Motorsports' Yamaha R1 concept, with a single-sided front swingarm
Pics: The Biker Gene

Over the last few decades, some manufacturers and independent specialists have tried to break away from the ubiquitous telescopic front fork, and tried various kinds of alternative front suspension on motorcycles. However, BMW seem to be the only bike manufacturers who’ve ever had any significant commercial success with bikes that had alternative front ends, while the Britten V1000 is probably the only successful racebike that did not use the conventional fork.

In theory, some alternative front ends – the front swingarm for example – can separately deal with the forces generated by braking, steering and cornering a motorcycle, and thus offer significantly better handling. In practice, however, very few of these systems seem to have worked.

In any case, there is no dearth of people who keep trying to find a suspension solution that’s better than the good old telescopic fork, and that’s where Tier Motorsports come in. This company has designed a concept motorcycle, based on the Yamaha R1, that’s fitted with a single-side swingarm and a monoshock in place of the regular USD fork.

Among a dozen other things, the Tier Motorsports’ front end uses a completely vertical steering axis, instead of the tilted steering axis that telescopic forks have to use because of their rake. Claimed advantages are adjustable dive under braking, more consistent steering, increased high speed stability, better ride comfort, full-range adjustability and an increase in braking performance.

The claimed advantages all sound good, but we wonder if this single-sided front swingarm will ever make to production reality. Given how good USD forks on modern sportsbikes have become, the possibility for alternative front suspension being accepted on mainstream bikes looks bleak. That is, unless this kind of suspension is backed up by some other pathbreaking technology, like two-wheel-drive perhaps. A 2WD Yamaha R1 with single-sided front and rear swingarms? Hmmm… now that would be interesting!

Also see:
More front end funnies...
The MotoGP-inspired 2009 Yamaha R1...
Hubless wheels for your motorcycle...?
Fearsome: The 1975 Yamaha TZ750 dirt-tracker...
Face-off: MV Agusta vs Ducati grand prix bikes!
The maddest Peugeot-powered motorcycle ever...
Battle of the Ninjas: Kawasaki ZZR1100 vs ZZR1400!
Some of the coolest trikes in the world...
Riding Troy Bayliss' Ducati 1098R...

Elsewhere today:
60 years of Derbi...
Only in America: Vertika Trykes...


Ride for kids, win this Fireblade. More details here

Tuesday, December 02, 2008

Eva Håkansson’s ElectroCat. Because petrol is ‘so last century…’


Eva, with the ElectroCat. Yup, this is the future...

A member of the KillaCycle racing team, the Sweden-based Eva Håkansson is, according to her own website, ‘a hardcore EV geek with a green heart and passion for power and speed.’ Yeah, well…

Ms Håkansson owns what she’s named the ElectroCat, Sweden’s first all-electric street legal motorcycle. Eva believes that petrol is very ‘last century,’ and has converted a 1990 Cagiva Freccia C12R to run on battery power. The bike’s two-stroke 125cc petrol engine has been replaced with an electric motor, a controller and batteries.

Built by Eva and her Dad, Sven, the ElectroCat is fitted with a Mars ETEK-RT permanent magnet DC motor, which is capable of 72V and 300-350A. This motor, which is fed by lithium-iron-phosphate batteries, pumps out around 7.5kW. The batteries take about seven hours to get fully charged, after which they’re good for 80km, provided you don’t go faster than 70km/h.

The ElectroCat, which weighs 165 kilos, is currently geared for a top speed of 100km/h, though that can be increased at the expense of acceleration. We’ve written about various electric bikes on this site over the last few months, and it does seem that these e-bikes are getting better gradually. Will electric bikes ultimately replace conventional petrol-engined bikes someday? In the next 10-15 years, you bet!

Also see:
TTX01: The 200km/h electric sportsbike...
UK study says women like big, noisy engines...
Greenfly: The LPG-powered motorcycle...
DTC: Taming the Ducati 1198S' power...
Quantya: Electric bikes go mainstream in the US...
Petrol-Hydrogen hybrid Kawasaki ZX-10R...
Fuel-cell powered mopeds, anyone?
Batteries and fuel cells not your style? What about air-powered engines then?

Elsewhere today:
Is this what the 2010 Honda VFR1000 going to look like...?
A treadmill bike, anyone...?

APC launches the airbag helmet for motorcyclists


APC's airbag helmet could be a life-saver for motorcyclists...

Based in Barcelona, Spain, APC Systems have come out with an innovation that could well save some lives. The Spanish company has developed crash helmets that incorporate an airbag, increasing the level of crash protection for motorcyclists.

According to the company, a small, simple control box fitted on the motorcycle receives and processes data, which allows it to determine when a collision may be imminent. When this ‘black box’ figures out that the rider is about to crash, it relays a signal which inflates the crash helmet’s airbag in less than 15/100th of a second, increasing safety levels for the rider.

There are no cables or any other physical elements linking the rider to the bike – the black box works on its own, in a manner that’s completely unobtrusive. And when it inflates, the airbag provides protection to the rider’s neck and back, reducing the chances of severe injury. In the event of a crash, the airbag stabilises the neck and protects the upper back, the benefits of which are obvious.

The APC helmet airbag is, apparently, only available in Spain right now, so we do hope it’ll also go on sale elsewhere in the world over the next few months. For more details on the company and the airbag helmet, visit the APC website here

Also see:
Will SHARP lead to better, safer helmets for motorcyclists?
Rider alert: Findings of the MAIDS report
One the pace: Read before you ride!
Better riding: 20 tips from the pros
Track riding for newbies: Tips from Ron Haslam
Dainese, AGV launch Agostini-replica helmet...
Hear up: Are you making too much noise?
Street survival: 50 tips from Motorcycle Cruiser magazine
Nanotechnology: Smart Helmets to the rescue...

Naked muscle: The Kawabusa II


Norm Wilding probably did not like the Suzuki B-King very much, so he decided to build his own Hayabusa-powered naked musclebike. And he seems to have done well...!

Pics: MidMoMc, via Motoblog

This very hot looking Kawabusa II special is the work of one Norm Wilding, at MidMoMc. The starting point for the bike was a 2003 Kawasaki ZRX1200R, which is where the chassis comes from. Everything else – including the engine, wheels, brakes, suspension and swingarm – are off a 2005 Suzuki Hayabusa.

This is, in fact, Wilding’s second Kawabusa, with significant improvements having been made to the original. Apart from various mechanical modifications, the bike benefits from various bolt-ons: carbonfibre front fender and rear hugger, gauges/instruments from a Suzuki GSX1400, headlight from a Suzuki Bandit, Renthal handlebars, BF Goodrich braided stainless steel brake lines, oil cooler and tail unit from a GSX-R1000, Yoshimura exhaust system and a Power Commander.

‘I built this bike because I love the power of the Hayabusa, and the upright riding position of the ZRX. The Kawabusa II sure is a blast to ride,’ says Wilding. But of course…

More muscle:
French muscle: The Wakan Roadster 100...
200bhp, Nitrous-fueled Suzuki B-King...
2009 Ducati Streetfighter: The hottest Italian muscle-bike ever...
Austrian muscle: Supercharged KTM RC8...
The scooter with the biggest muscles ever...
German muscle: The wild new BMW K1300R...
American muscle: The Roehr 1250SC...
Japanese muscle: The mighty Yamaha V-Max
Peugeot V6 muscle... on a bike!

Elsewhere today:
2008 NEC Show: The hot bits...
Bikes gone mad: Kawasaki Z1300 takes on Honda CBX1000...

Riding Noriyuki Haga’s Yamaha YZF-R1…


Nitro Nori's 220bhp YamExpress. Awesome...


Finishing in second spot overall in 2007 and 2008, the Yamaha R1 has done reasonably well in World Superbikes. Motociclismo recently had the opportunity to ride Noriyuki ‘Nitro’ Haga’s YZF-R1 racebike, and here are some excerpts from what they have to say about the machine:

The ultra-aggressive Haga, on his Yamaha, reminds us of the Kamikaze pilots on their Zero fighters. But you actually don’t need to get aggressive with Haga’s R1 – the bike is very manageable and manoeuvrable. In addition to the excellent chassis, perhaps some of that is down to the R1’s MotoGP-spec Öhlins fork and electronically controlled rear shock.

On this bike, the suspension is connected to an on-board computer that works in conjunction with the bike’s telemetry system, constantly adjusting the suspension as needed. But the system is not perfect, and if the rider is too heavy or too light (compared to Haga), the electronics can’t compensate for that. Which is probably why we found some constant wiggling from the fork under braking…

The engine in Haga’s racebike is, of course, very different from a stock R1, with major changes to the camshafts, gaskets, cylinder heads and… almost everything else. There is a lot of power at even low to medium revs, while the top-end power delivery is simply endless. And then there is Yamaha’s traction control system, which is just fantastic. Just like the bike’s Brembo brakes, it’s hard to come to terms with just how well it really works at the limit…

With next year’s MotoGP-inspired R1, we suppose Yamaha would be taking things up to the next level. We can only imagine how good that bike would be to ride.

For the full test report, visit Motociclismo here

Noriyuki Haga’s Yamaha YZF-R1: Tech specs

Engine: 998cc, 16-valve, DOHC, liquid-cooled inline-four
Power: In excess of 210bhp
Ignition: Magneti Marelli
Gearbox: Six-speed
Chassis: Aluminium twin-spar
Suspension: 43mm USD Öhlins fork, Öhlins monoshock, both ends electronically adjustable
Brakes: Twin 320mm discs at front, with four-piston Brembo monobloc radial-mount callipers (front), single 203mm disc with twin-piston callipers (rear)
Wheels and tyres: 16.5 inches, 120/65 (front), 190/65 (rear)
Weight: 162kg

Also see:
Big Bang: The 2009 Yamaha R1...
Remapped: The 2009 Yamaha YZF-R6...
Custom cool: Mad specials from Icon...
Higgins-Aubé show the Energya trike...
Pics, specs and video: The 2009 Kawasaki ZX-6R...
Suzuki heat up the GSX-R1000 for 2009...!
2009 Buell 1125CR riding impression...
The hot, new BMW K1300R gets rolling...
Marisa Miller does the Harley-Davidson V-Rod Muscle...

Elsewhere today:
Two wheels are good, eight wheels are better...?
A Honda DN-01 trike...?!

Saturday, November 29, 2008

Duel in hell: BMW HP2 Sport vs KTM RC8


BMW HP2 Sport takes on the KTM 1190 RC8. But which one is the best?

The Nurburgring, called the Nordschleife since 1983, is probably the toughest, most challenging race circuit in the world. Often called the ‘Green Hell,’ the Nordschleife is all of 20.83km long, with 33 left and 40 right turns. It runs through picturesque valleys and mountains, but on the track, most people are going much too fast to have any time to admire the view.

Töff magazine recently had the opportunity to pit a KTM RC8 against a BMW HP2 Sport, with their test rider Helmut Dähne thrashing both bikes around the Nordschleife. Some people have all the luck in the world, eh? Anyway, here are some excerpts from what Töff and Dähne have to say about the two bikes:

For what it’s worth, the KTM attracts more attention than the BMW, with people stopping to take pictures and ask about the bike. Also, the RC8’s seating position is surprisingly comfortable – riding it 500km on the highway is effortless. It even lets you easily carry some luggage with you. KTM engineers seem to have thought of everything. BMW, the touring specialists, are not even offering any luggage options on the HP2 Sport. It’s a twisted world…


The RC8 has the better engine, the BMW has the better chassis...

The BMW HP2 Sport – the strongest, most athletic Boxer ever promises to deliver pure sportsbike-spec riding dynamics, as does the KTM RC8. So, the Green Hell is the right place to be testing these bikes, as it would the maximum amount of strain on the chassis, gearbox and brakes.

And speaking of the chassis, the BMW’s is clearly better. It offers very precise handling, always letting you stick to the chosen line. The KTM feels a bit more… nervous. In fast bends, it’s not always easy for the KTM rider to stick to his chosen line. You must often make frequent corrections to the steering and it takes some time before you can really settle in with this bike. In terms of sheer handling prowess, the BMW clearly has an advantage with its chassis.


Riding these bikes at the limit is hard work. Much harder than, say, a Fireblade

Where the Boxer suffers is low-rev torque – there simply isn’t enough. There’s no getting away from it – the KTM engine is much better. Sure, it vibrates more than the BMW, but the power delivery is linear, more consistent. The HP2’s engine isn’t as soft, gentle as a Japanese inline-four, but it certainly feels more pleasant than the KTM engine, which vibrates enough to shake the ends of the bike’s handlebars.

Overall, neither bike is suitable for amateurs. Both, the BMW and the KTM, are much harder to get the best out of than, say, a new Fireblade. However, we must say the BMW is the more consistent of the two.

For the full shootout, visit the Töff website here

Specs: BMW HP2 Sport

Engine: Four-valves-per-cylinder, DOHC, 1170cc boxer-twin

Power: 133bhp at 8,750rpm, 115Nm at 6,000rpm

Chassis and suspension: Steel tube frame, Telelever front fork with Öhlins spring, Single-sided Paralever with Öhlins spring at the back, both ends fully adjustable

Brakes: Twin 320mm discs with four-piston callipers at the front, single 265mm disc at the back

Wheels and tyres: 17-inch forged alloy wheels, showd with 120/70 (front) and 190/55 (rear) tyres

Weight: 199kg with fuel

Specs: KTM 1190 RC8

Engine: Four-valves-per-cylinder, DOHC, 1148cc v-twin

Power: 154bhp at 10,000rpm, 120Nm at 8,000rpm

Chassis and suspension: Steel tube frame, WP 43mm USD forks, WP monoshock, both ends fully adjustable

Brakes: Twin 320mm discs with four-piston callipers at front, single 220mm disc at the back

Wheels and tyres: 17-inch alloy wheels, shod with 120/70 (front) and 190/55 (rear) tyres

Weight: 198kg with fuel

Also see:
Face-off: KTM RC8 vs Yamaha R1...!
Bimota DB7 first ride...
The world's first supercharged KTM RC8...
Battle of the Twins: Ducati 1098 vs KTM 1190 RC8
The Husqvarna V1000 GT concept...
Pics and specs: The amazing Ducati Streetfighter...
The very cool BMW Lo-Rider concept...
Moto Morini Scrambler 1200 to go on sale next year...
The 200bhp Suzuki B-King. WE WANT ONE!!!

Elsewhere today:
If you really want to drink and ride, get a can of this...

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