Monday, October 19, 2009

2010 Honda VFR1200F: First ride by CMG Online


Can the new Honda VFR1200F live up to its pre-launch hype? Hmmm....

Right now, Costa Mouzouris has to be one of the luckiest motorcyclists in the world – he has filed what we think is the world’s first riding impression of the 2010 Honda VFR1200F, for the Canadian Motorcycle Guide. Here are some excerpts from what Mouzouris has to say about the new Honda:

‘Physically, the VFR1200 feels slimmer and lighter than bikes like the BMW K1300GT, the Yamaha FJR1300 and the Kawasaki Concours 14 – machines which the Honda will inevitably be compared with. It’s also lighter, according to the spec sheet, which puts its wet weight at 21 kilos lighter than the BMW K1300GT,’ says Mouzouris, who adds that the VFR’s fit and finish are impeccable and that the bike looks quite sleek.

Going on to compare the new bike’s riding position with that of the Honda ST1300’s, Mouzouris says the VFR’s riding position is not as relaxed and upright, though it’s still much closer to a grand-touring machine than that of a supersport. ‘The seat is wide and supportive, but more time in the saddle will reveal if the ergonomics can sustain long-distance travel. Reach to the ground will be easy for average sized riders,’ he says.

Of course, that brand-new V4 engine is what most people have been waiting for, and it doesn’t fail to impress. ‘The engine is remarkably torquey and very powerful. Throttle response is instantaneous but easily manageable,’ says Mouzouris. However, he seems to have been a bit disappointed with the Honda’s low-rpm pulling power. ‘I rolled on the throttle full from about 2,000rpm in second gear, expecting to have my arms stretched straight, but was surprised to discover that the engine pulled in a subdued manner,’ he says.


For those who aren’t convinced with Honda’s decision to go with shaft – rather than chain – drive on the new VFR, Mouzouris offers some reassurance. ‘Honda has done a remarkable job of controlling driveline lash, and rolling on and off the throttle is exceptionally smooth. As well, the gearbox on the manual-shift model we rode was light-shifting, precise and quiet. Also, the new drive shaft system, which locates the transmission output shaft below the swingarm pivot to reduce driveshaft jacking, works as claimed, with no noticeable hopping or squatting,’ he says.

Mouzouris concludes his report saying that he wasn’t too impressed with the VFR’s exhaust note when the engine was idling, though the sound improved under hard acceleration, at higher revs. He also says a more comprehensive riding impression might be on the way soon. So, of course, stay tuned…

See the original article on CMG Online here


Promo video for the VFR1200F. It's a bit dull, but you still might want to take a look anyway...

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