Tuesday, February 03, 2009

BQR-Honda unveils the first Moto2 bike


Yes indeed, that's what Moto2 bikes will look like. Missing 250 two-strokes already?

Pics: Motociclismo

The Spanish Honda-BQR team has unveiled the very first Moto2 bike, which will make its debut this season in the Spanish Roadracing Championship (CEV) this year. The same bike – with, of course, some engine/chassis developments – will also go on to race in the Moto2 series in 2011, when 250cc two-strokes will make way for 600cc four-stroke machines.

BQR-Honda’s Moto2 bike uses a 599cc, DOHC, 16-valve, liquid-cooled inline-four sourced from Honda. Featuring Honda’s PGM-FI electronic fuel injection, this engine makes 140 horsepower and is mated to a six-speed gearbox. The double beam chassis is made of aluminium, the steering geometry is adjustable and suspension is Show – 43mm USD fork and monoshock, both fully adjustable.

The bike rides on 17-inch forged magnesium wheels, shod with 125/80 (front) and 190/55 (rear) Dunlop slicks. Twin 300mm brake discs with four-piston radial-mount callipers are used at front, and single 220mm disc with twin-piston calliper is fitted at the back wheel. Ready to race, the bike weighs 137kg.

Over the years, the two-stroke 250cc class has witnessed some great racing – fast, furious, all-out action that’s often spectacular to watch. We don’t really know if the Moto2 class will provide the same thrills. It probably won’t. However, with two-stroke engines having faded away into history, there really isn’t, perhaps, any point in manufacturers continuing to spend huge sums of money towards the development of these engines for racing. So, Moto2 it’s going to be and racing fans everywhere will just have to learn to live with that...

Also see:
Memorable: The Bimota V-Due...
Turbocharged Ducati drag racers...
Blast from the past: Moriwaki Dream Fighter...
450bhp Suzuki B-King, anyone...?
Alstare develop biofuel-powered GSX-R...
The best race-rep Fireblade ever...
Face-off: Caterham R500 vs Ducati Hypermotard...
Kawasaki ZX-10R: The future is orange...

Picture perfect: The BMW S1000RR


Model Ann Kathrin Ruhl, astride the BMW S1000RR



BMW have released new pics of its S1000RR superbike, with model Ann Kathrin Ruhl upping the glam quotient. While bikes like the BMW K1300R, K1300S and HP2 Sport do offer a fair bit of performance, the S1000RR – the machine which BMW will be racing in World Superbikes this year – is in a different league altogether.

With its aluminium beam frame, high-spec USD fork and monoshock (both ends fully adjustable), Brembo brakes, carbonfibre bodywork and high-revving 1,000cc inline-four that makes about 200bhp at the crank, the S1000RR is more in line with Japanese litre-class superbikes. That, and perhaps even more, because the S1000RR is likely to be equipped with advanced traction control, ABS, variable length air-intake tracts and positive valve actuation of some sort, the details of which have not been revealed yet by BMW.

When the road going version of the S1000RR goes on sale – probably towards the end of this year – the bike is expected to cost around US$15,000. If BMW can stick to that kind of pricing, the 1000RR should be a lot of bike for a relatively reasonable amount of money.

With all-new bikes like the Aprilia RSV4 and the 2009 Yamaha R1 and Suzuki GSX-R1000 to beat in World Superbikes this year, BMW riders Troy Corser and Ruben Xaus are going to face an uphill battle. Still, with BMW prepared to go all out on research and development, the S1000RR’s prospects don’t look too bad at all…

Monday, February 02, 2009

2009 Yamaha YZR M1 and Valentino Rossi unveiled...


2009 Yamaha YZR M1 and The Doctor. We're hoping this will be the most effective combo in the 2009 MotoGP season, making mincemeat out of Casey 'Loudmouth' Stoner...

Yamaha have just released pics and specs of the 2009 YZR M1 and the new, spruced-up-for-2009 Valentino Rossi. We’ll start with the M1, which still packs more than 200bhp from its inline-four and has a top speed in excess of 320km/h. The gearbox is a six-speed cassette-type unit, with quick-swappable ratios, while the chassis is an aluminium twin tube delta box jobbie, with multi-adjustable steering geometry, wheelbase and ride height.

The swingarm is made of aluminium, suspension is Ohlins (front and rear), adjustable for everything that can possibly be adjusted, and then some. The brakes are Brembo – twin 320mm carbon discs with four-piston callipers at front, single 220mm stainless steel disc with twin-piston calliper at the back.

The 2009 M1 weighs 148 kilos (in accordance with FIM regulations) and rides on 16.5-inch Marchesini wheels that are available in a variety of rim widths and which are shod with Bridgestone tyres – slick, intermediate, wet or hand-cut.

‘I had the chance to try the 2009 prototype briefly after Valencia, but more so in Jerez, when I was very fast. The bike seems better and I was faster than I was with the 2008 version. I'm very confident, and anyway we're only at the beginning of our work and now we must use these months before April to improve the 2009 M1 even more,’ says Valentino Rossi, speaking about the 2009 YZR M1. 'We're working a lot on the engine and we're trying to find a way to improve the acceleration a bit, and I think that this is the area in which we will be concentrating,' he adds.

Yamaha have also been working on engine management controls and fuel injection maps, with which they hope to improve acceleration significantly. The aim is to allow Rossi and Lorenzo to open the throttle earlier - and harder - while exiting corners. 'In 2008, when we won everything - the Constructors' title, the Riders' title, the Teams' title - it provoked great motivation and reaction from rival riders and factories, and they must have all started working to produce a bike capable of beating us. We'll do the same,' says Rossi's team manager, Davide Brivio.

Moving on from the M1 and coming to the 2009 Valentino Rossi, The Doctor is in fine fettle as ever. With six MotoGP world championships to his credit, Rossi is now the only man who’s ever won world championships in the two-stroke 500cc as well four-stroke 990cc and 800cc classes.

Now 30 years old, No.46 will be one of the top contenders for winning the 2009 MotoGP world championship. Of course, he doesn’t need the money anymore – he races because he loves it. Rossi earned an estimated US$34 million in 2007 and probably much more in 2008. This year, global recession or not, The Doctor could be raking in as much as US$45 million according to some estimates.

Do we think Rossi will kick Stoner’s arse all over the world again, this year? But of course. Go……!!!!!

Also see:
Huge collection of MotoGP wallpaper from the 2008 season...
Vittoriano Guareschi is impressed with the 2009 Ducati GP9 racebike...
Barry Sheene tribute GSX-R750...
Face-off: 2009 Yamaha R1 vs 1990s Yamaha 500 GP bikes...
Riding impression: Regis Laconi’s WSBK Kawasaki ZX-10R...
Memorable: Graeme Crosby and his bikes...
Duel in hell: BMW HP2 Sport vs KTM RC8...

Elsewhere today:
Pics from the 2009 London Motorcycle Show...

Sunday, February 01, 2009

Face-off: Moto Morini Granpasso vs BMW R1200GS


Moto Morini Granpasso vs BMW R1200GS, Italian panache vs German engineering...

In terms of genuine all-around capability as well as that carefully cultivated ‘adventure’ image, the BMW R1200GS is pretty much at the top of its game. Not that it prevents other manufacturers from trying to wrest the big Beemer’s crown though. One of the latest challengers in the arena is the Moto Morini Granpasso. Moto Revue recently had the opportunity pit the two bikes against each, and here are some excerpts from what they had to say:

Starting off on the two bikes, the first thing that strikes you is the height of their saddles – 875mm for the Moto Morini, 850-870mm (adjustable) for the BMW. Both bikes need fairly tall riders, otherwise you have to stand on the tips of your toes to keep your balance when these bikes are at rest. It’s just as well, then, that Moto Morini plan to launch a new version of the Granpasso soon, which will come with an 830mm seat height…

The R1200GS is bigger and heavier than the Granpasso. The BMW is 935mm wide and weighs 244 kilos, while the Moto Morini is only 850mm wide and at 234kg, it is 10 kilos lighter. The Granpasso looks more elegant, like the KTM 990 Adventure, while the R1200GS is bigger and bulkier, like the Moto Guzzi Stelvio.

At 13,450 euros, the BMW is more expensive than the Moto Morini, which comes in at 12,990 euros. Both bikes are fairly high-tech and well equipped. The BMW is fitted with the Bavarian company’s Telelever (front) and Paralever (rear) suspension, with shaft drive. The Moto Morini comes with an adjustable Öhlins shock, hydroformed aluminium swingarm, tubular-steel chassis from Verlicchi, Excel wheels and Brembo brakes.

On the move, both bikes feel quite manageable. The BMW’s riding position is very good and all the controls are quite intuitive. The Moto Morini’s clutch is a bit stiffer and the gearbox isn’t quite as slick and accurate as the BMW’s. The BMW also inches ahead in terms of overall comfort and weather protection, with its big, padded saddle and adjustable windscreen scoring higher than the Moto Morini’s.


The Granpasso is sportier, the R1200GS is more versatile and comfortable...

The Moto Morini seems better suited to smooth tarmac, while the BMW is better at handling the rough stuff. The German bike is slower to respond to rider inputs – it doesn’t change direction very quickly, and can be a bit tricky to manage under hard braking, though things seem to improve a bit with the optional electronically adjustable suspension (ESA). But while the BMW is better off-road, the Moto Morini is better on the tarmac – it feels more responsive and is quicker and faster than the Beemer.

The Granpasso is more focused towards being sporty, while the BMW is more versatile and comfortable. The Moto Morini’s seat, which feels quite comfortable initially, starts feeling a bit too stiff after a while. Also, its adjustable windscreen isn’t as effective as the BMW’s – wind turbulence seems to be a constant problem at almost all speeds – and its brakes aren’t as powerful as those on the German bike. Finally, the Granpasso’s 6.2m turning radius, compared to the BMW’s 4.9m, is a big disadvantage for the Italian machine, especially in the city, on narrow roads and while making U-turns.

The wide open road is where the Moto Morini really belongs – that’s where its 1,187cc v-twin can really breathe. Designed by Franco Lambertini, the Italian engine sounds almost like an American V8 at times and quite encourages you to be generous with the throttle, rewarding you with satisfying bursts of power. Measured on our test bench, the Moto Morini engine produced 120.5bhp, a bit more than the BMW 1,170cc boxer-twin’s 112.5bhp.

In the real world, the Granpasso’s 8bhp advantage isn’t enough to give it a significant performance edge over the R1200GS. If anything, the German engine feels smoother at low revs, while the Italian engine feels more free-revving and delivers its punch in the higher reaches of its rev range. In the end, both engines deliver the goods though the way they do it feels quite different. Both bikes are quite competent – it’s just that they do things in their own unique way…

For the full article, visit the Moto Revue website here

Also see:
All-new dual-purpose Ducati to be unveiled later this year...?
Kawasaki Z900-based dirt-tracker...
Kevin Schwantz on what he teaches nowadays...
A Yamaha R1 that's not scared of the Ducati 1098...
Repsol KTM 690 Rally: What lies beneath...
The BMW-powered, Lotus-designed snow scooter from hell...
Harley-Davidson to revive Cagiva...?
Riding impression: Moto Guzzi Millepercento BB1...

Elsewhere today:
Size matters: V8-powered motorcycles...


The guys at Superbike magazine are working hard to improve motorcyclists' lives...!

Friday, January 30, 2009

Blastolene go mad with supercharged V8 Hemi-powered trike


For those who've always wanted a supercharged, 500bhp trike...

Pics: Autoblog

If the ZZR1400-powered Campagna T-Rex isn’t mad enough for you, meet Blastolene’s latest creation – the Hemi-powered trike you see here. We don’t know how much power its supercharged Hemi V8 makes, but we wouldn’t be surprised if that figure is around 500bhp or more.

Apart from all that power, the Blastolene trike’s single-sided front swingarm looks interesting. Of course, how it rides and handles may not be very important because we doubt if too many people will actually be able to ride the thing. For starters, you may not be able to look at the road ahead because of that huge engine sitting right in front of you. And then, given its length, we don’t know how manageable this trike will be, in rush hour traffic.

Still, we suppose some collectors just might be mad – and rich – enough to want one for their garage…

Also see:
A Ferrari-Hayabusa trike, anyone...?
2009 Yamaha R1 riding impressions...
Trillium Muir, the fastest woman in the world on two wheels...
2009 BMW K1300S riding impression...
MTT Turbine Streetfighter: The fastest motorcycle in the world...
Memorable: Graeme Crosby and his bikes...
UK study says women like big, noisy engines...!
Riding Troy Bayliss' WSBK Ducati 1098R-based racebike...

All-new dual-purpose Ducati for 2010?


A Ducati dual-purpose adventure bike? Er... well, yeah, why not...
Pic: InfoMotori

According to various European motorcycle magazines and websites, Ducati are working on an all-new dual-purpose bike for 2010. An ‘adventure-type’ bike, the new Ducati could be fitted with the 1098 engine and would be positioned in the BMW R1200GS space.

While the Multistrada and Hypermotard are definitely street-oriented, the 2010 Ducati dual-purpose adventure bike would be optimised for on and off-road use and could use a host of new technologies that would make it lighter, more powerful and more capable than similar machines from BMW, KTM, Moto Morini, Moto Guzzi and others.

Nobody knows what the new Ducati would ultimately look like, but most people expect the bike to use design elements from the 1198 and the Streetfighter, and would be fitted with a single-side rear swingarm. We’ll post more details on this bike as they become available, but don’t expect to see the actual production version of the bike before the EICMA show this year…

Also see:
Classic: 1970s Laverda 750SF...
Riding Noriyuki Haga's Yamaha R1 racebike...
Gordon Murray: "The MV Agusta F4 is so slow...!"
2009 Yamaha XJ6 riding impression...
Back on track: Campagna T-Rex...
Barry Sheene tribute Suzuki GSX-R750...
Memorable: The Bimota SB2...

Elsewhere today:
If you aren't already wearing the best helmet you can afford to buy, you will, after you see this...

The X Factor: 2009 Buell Lightning CityX XB9SX


The Buell Lightning CityX XB9SX. That's a lot of X...

Pics: Buell

The first thing about the Buell CityX XB9SX that strikes us is that… it has too many Xs in its name! The Honda CBR1100XX Super Blackbird settled for two, but the Buell goes one further with three. Someone at Buell is obsessed with X…

Anyway, the Buell Lightning CityX XB9SX is now available in a new, all-black paintjob, with blue and cherry-red being the other colour available for 2009. The engine is the same air-cooled, fuel-injected 948cc v-twin as before, that makes 80 horsepower at 7,500rpm and 79Nm of torque at 4,500 revs.

The usual Buell bits are all there – Intuitive Response Chassis (IRC) that’s made of aluminium, Zero Torsional Load (ZTL) braking system that comprises a single 375mm rotor mounted to the front wheel’s perimeter, with six-piston callipers, fully adjustable 43mm Showa USD fork and fully adjustable monoshock, underslung exhaust for mass centralisation, six-spoke 17-inch cast aluminium wheels shod with Pirelli Scorpion Sync tyres, and belt drive which, according to Buell, never needs replacing, maintenance or adjustments of any kind.

The CityX XB9SX weighs 177kg dry and with its upright seating position and wide, flat handlebars, the bike is ideal for street riding. At around US$8,900 this bike probably isn’t for those whose idea of ‘performance’ is a CBR600RR or a GSX-R750, but Buell fans should love it...

Also see:
Face-off: Buell 1125R vs BMW HP2 Sport!
Custom cool: Tamworth Yamaha FZ1...
Buell 1125CR riding impression...
RetroSBK's GSX-R1000-based Yoshimura GS tribute...
Buell 1125CR takes on BMW K1300R...
Making it snappier: The Gurney Alligator Instigator...
In conversation with Leslie Porterfield, the fastest woman in America...

Elsewhere today:
LJK Setright on the Honda CBX...
Blast from the past: Old school GSX-R...
Motorcycling and the School of Rock...

Monday, January 26, 2009

And now, a Ferrari-Hayabusa trike!


A Ferrari-Hayabusa three-wheeler? Well, at least it looks pretty cool...


Pics: Carzi

A Suzuki Hayabusa, first converted into a trike and then painted in Ferrari F1 racing colours? Well, yeah, why not. Created by Trike Japan, this Ferrari-Hayabusa looks pretty cool to us. And according to the details available on its official website, the trike weighs 520kg, retains the stock Hayabusa engine (1,340cc inline-four that makes 196bhp@9,800rpm) and will seat two people. Prices are not mentioned, though we suppose this three-wheeled wonder may be a bit less expensive than a new California Coupe

Also see:
The only genuine Ferrari motorcycle in the world...
Gut-wrenching: The Hayabusa-powered SR8LM...
Italian racer-chic: Colnago Ferrari bikes...
It's all Bull: When Lamborghini made a motorcycle...
Peugeot V6-powered bike...
An Alfa-Romeo motorcycle...!
A different take on building a three-wheeled Hayabusa...

Elsewhere today?
Ferrari trike, not your style? Perhaps you'd like this Lamborghini ATV then...
Pedestrians, watch out PLEASE!

Friday, January 23, 2009

Xenophya Design: In conversation with Mark Wells and Ian Wride


Mark Wells and Ian Wride of Xenophya Design ponder the mysteries of motorcycle tailpiece design

Set up by Mark Wells and Ian Wride back in 2001, Xenophya Design is a UK-based motorcycle design consultancy – one of the very few such outfits in Europe. Xenophya recently moved into a new office that’s located in the Northumberland countryside, in the North East of England. Situated in a relatively inconspicuous building, the facility includes a design office, a clay-modelling studio and a workshop with painting facilities.

Mark and Ian have, apparently, built up a significant portfolio of motorcycle design projects over the year, though they can’t talk about much of their work because most of their clients insist on complete confidentiality. ‘Some of our most impressive, innovative work is confidential and not meant for public, much less competitor consumption,’ says Ian. ‘On occasion we have to stay completely anonymous. Some contracts state that we can't even mention that we worked for the client let alone be allowed to use anything in our portfolio. That’s just the way the industry works,’ adds Mark.

Now, since motorcycle design is one subject we’re deeply passionate about here at Faster and Faster, we asked Mark and Ian to speak about their work and their thoughts on motorcycle design. Here are some excerpts from what they had to say:

On why they chose to go with the name Xenophya

The word Xenophya is derived from Greek and means ‘strange in shape or nature.’ It seemed to suit what we were doing when first started up…

On how they got started with motorcycle design

It’s been a lifelong ambition – we can’t imagine doing anything else. After graduating from Northumbria University’s Transportation Design course in 2000, we wanted to be involved in bike design, by whatever means possible. Mark’s final year project was to redesign the Ducati 900SS, giving it a completely different image based on the standard chassis. This would broaden Ducati’s product line with minimal investment, or could be sold as a kit.

It showed potential as a product, so we set about designing an aftermarket kit for the Kawasaki ZX-9R, which could be simply bolted on in place of the original plastics. Once that was finished in clay, we got a bit of publicity which resulted in an accessories manufacturer asking us to design some parts for their range. To help pay the bills, the aftermarket kits got put on hold and the consulting has grown ever since.

On their favourite bikes, from the design perspective

This is a never ending theme of discussion in the studio and the answers tend to change from day to day. The problem is from a design point of view it’s all about context. For example, the Ducati 1098 is more evocative than say a Kawasaki Versys, but it can be argued that the Versys is a better piece of design. With the Versys, the designers at Kawasaki had to re-invent an existing product and make it appeal to an entirely new market – not an easy task. All the Ducati design team had to do was evolve a classic design - easy? Well, perhaps not, but you get the point.

It’s also tempting to ignore the obvious answers such as the 916 and instead tell you all about how important the Scott Flying Squirrel was, in order to demonstrate our in-depth and esoteric knowledge, but that would be a bit pretentious. So, without stating the obvious and listing the same models that appear in every top 10 bikes ever supplement, these are some of the bikes that are etched in our subconscious:

We both ride bikes and have a bit of a two-stroke habit, especially the early-90s Japanese race reps. The little RGV and NSR250s have great proportions and are two of the best looking bikes ever. They are anti-socially noisy and smokey. They demand focus. They handle better than almost anything and have enough power to put a big grin on your face without being caught out doing 180mph before you know it. That’s why it’s where our money went and that’s what we own. Mark has a NSR250 MC21 SP and I have an RGV250 VJ23. The world needs bikes like these again!

Going back a little further, the RD350LC (RZ to the rest of the world) was from the same school. I’ve always wanted one and at some stage, if I ever get a spare moment, I will find a seized one and restore it.

For Mark, as a kid, the posters he had on his bedroom wall were of the Norton F1 rotary, in JPS colours – the racer not the road bike. His dad even took him to see Trevor Nation and Steve Spray race the F1s in the British super bikes at Brands hatch…

We are both fans of and very influenced by 50s British racing singles like the Manx Norton, the AJS 7R and the Matchless G50. Each of these bikes is beautifully proportioned, with a dramatic horizontal line separating the organic forms of the tank/seat from the rest of the bike. Late 60s GP bikes like the Honda RC166 are also fantastic, not just to look at, but you’ve not lived until you’ve heard a six-cylinder 250. We first saw one being ridden in the flesh at the Goodwood Festival of Speed a couple of years ago.


A 250cc concept bike designed for a bike manufacturer based in India...

On how Xenophya works with bike manufacturers

We tend to work together with our customers to create the design brief. In an ideal world, we will take their marketing material and conduct our own research into the target consumer, resulting in a report which outlines the goals for the product. This is then used to inform the brief and the direction of the product.

What they want and what we want are irrelevant in a way. The product should be about what the target consumer wants. If we decide to make a bike red, it should be because that what will sell, not because it’s the CEO’s favourite colour.

It is also true that many of the large manufacturers have their own in-house design studios. Most of them however still commission external designers to work on projects. That could be to input some fresh ideas at the early concept generation stage, or to act as an overflow where their own staff are engaged on a project and something else needs doing. Some OEMs such as KTM and Yamaha have exclusive tie-ups with external studios such as Kiska and GK design. Certain parts of the process are regularly outsourced – for instance it’s not uncommon for OEMs to outsource clay modelling to a third party.

On the more interesting projects they’ve worked on

Working on the Fischer MRX650 was our first experience on a full bike. We were contacted in 2003 by Glynn Kerr, who needed help in building the clay model and subsequent model for the Indianapolis show. The design was done entirely by Glynn but working with him and the chaps at Gemini Racing in Milwaukee taught us a lot.

More recently the Royal Enfield Bullet Classic was great fun. Being British, it was a real opportunity for us to work on an old British brand which is one of the longest in continuous production. Royal Enfield really recognise the value in their brand and have made a real effort to embrace it and retain the heritage which I think shows in the product. It also meant we got to travel to India and were introduced to their domestic market which is now a key part of our business.

On working with bike manufacturers based in Asia

We have worked with Royal Enfield and a number of others. Bikes in Asia are still predominantly about transport, in Europe and the US they are a lifestyle product. This is changing in Asia and bikes like the Yamaha R15 are leading way in introducing new market segments. We were at the Delhi Auto Expo in January last year and the atmosphere on the Yamaha stand was truly electric – it reminded me of the excitement I felt the first time I visited a motorcycle show as a school boy. That’s not to say Europeans don’t get excited about bikes, but somehow it seemed more visceral, rawer in India.

The biggest physical difference in the products is the scale. On average, Asian populations are anthropometrically smaller, so bikes are designed with appropriate ergonomic triangles. In Europe we’re used to bigger bikes. Apart from a recent resurgence in 125s and scooters, most bikes are over 500cc. In Asia, it’s all about affordable, practical transport so priorities are completely different. Bikes are mostly under 200cc and need to be versatile. In markets like India, there are also specialist requirements such as sari guards which need to be taken into account when designing a new motorcycle.

The biggest difference however is in the volumes that are manufactured and sold. The whole of Europe and Japan combined manufactured around 3.5 million units in 2006 compared to seven million in India and a mind blowing 20 million units (nearly half of all global production) in China. These vast quantities affect how you go about designing a motorcycle. In Europe, the number of bikes that a manufacturer predicts it can sell will greatly influence the method of manufacturing – tooling cost is a crucial consideration when deciding whether a design is feasible or not. In Asia, however, the numbers of units manufactured is so vast that tooling costs become less significant. Instead, raw material/part prices are a higher priority.

On Japanese vs European motorcycle design

The Japanese are technically superb, practical, reliable and governed by strict brand guidelines. Their design is equally well governed and subsequently competent – you rarely see a genuinely ugly Japanese bike (although someone at Kawasaki must have misplaced the manual when they designed the ZZR1400). The Yamaha R-series is a great example of good design evolution over time. The current R1 can be easily traced back 10 years – the current model is clearly related to the 1998 model, but still looks modern. The 2002 model is actually one of the prettiest bikes in recent years and had it been painted red with the D word written on it, it might have attracted more attention. Can I add that to my list?

European design is self-proclaimed as being more passionate and creative, however the truth is the Japanese are every bit as enthusiastic, passionate and creative. The Italians are particularly good at shouting about ‘Italian Style.’ They aren’t so keen on telling everyone that the designers in these companies responsible for some of the memorable models are often not Italian. In truth, most design studios are very multinational environments with teams of engineers and designers from all over the world contributing to the final product. At Xenophya, we regularly employ a network of design professionals from all over the world.

On how they expect motorcycle design to evolve in the future

In pure styling terms, we’ve seen motorcycles, sportsbikes particularly, becoming increasingly complex. The Yamaha R6 is probably the most extreme example, with a high panel count and complex surfaces. I think this has peaked and will start to move back to simpler forms – the new R1 already shows signs of that.

One aspect which we have seen grow recently is the role of the importers and their relationships with Asian factories. The influx of low cost models from Asia has prompted smaller manufacturers and even larger importers to take a scooter, for example, and make it their own by replacing the body. This presents new opportunities for outsourced design companies to work with a greater range of clients wanting to differentiate their products.

Although still extremely popular, there has, in Western European markets, recently been a shift away from the hyper-sports category of motorcycles. We suspect (and hope) that a new selection of mid-sized experience oriented products will enter the market to cater for people who want to be thrilled, and involved without necessarily doing 200mph.

It seems almost inevitable that we will see an ever greater number of electric and alternative fuelled motorcycles on the market. The challenge here will be to create products which are as exciting and involving as current motorcycles are.

We thank Mark and Ian for taking the time to answer all our questions. And we wish them all the best – hope Xenophya gets to work on many exciting motorcycle design projects in the future...!

Also see:
In conversation with Gerald Kiska, of Kiska Design...
Pierre Terblanche moves on from Ducati...
Massimo Tamburini retires from MV Agusta...
Derbi: Carlos Carrasco’s GPR Concept...
Nitin Design: The Dacoit roams free...!
Ecosse ES1 engineer wins design award...
CIV: The Lotus-designed snow scooter from hell...

Elsewhere today:
Yeah, well, but we'd still be happy to ride anybody's 2009 Yamaha R1...
The Wesll Quad: Lean into it...

Thursday, January 22, 2009

1975 Kawasaki Z900-based dirt-tracker special


A Kaw Z900-based dirt-tracker? Why not!
Pics: Ottonero

Built by Gitielle Moto, the Kawasaki dirt-tracker-style machine you see here is based on a 1975 Z900. Of course, apart from the engine, fuel tank and side panels, very little remains of the original machine.

The chassis has been modified extensively, the front fork has been taken from a Kawasaki GPZ900R, the adjustable rear shock absorbers are Bitubo units, the aluminium swingarm is a custom-built one-off item, the brakes (300mm disc at the front, 240mm disc at the back) are from Beringer and the bike’s 17-inch wheels are shod with Pirelli rubber – 120/70 at the front, 160/60 at the back.

Other changes include a hydraulic clutch, a custom-built seat covered with special slip-resistant upholstery and the wild green paintjob that you’ll either love or hate...!

Of course, the regular Z900 was a handsome beast in its own right...

Also see:
Big CC Racing's Kawasaki ZZR1400 Turbo...
The fearsome 1975 Yamaha TZ750 dirt-tracker...
Down memory lane: Board-track racing in the US...
1992 Kawasaki ZX-7R special...
Riding impression: Moriwaki MD250H...
In conversation with Kevin Schwantz...
The quickest Kawasaki ZX-12R in the world...

Elsewhere today:
One-off: The Triumph Quadrent...
A battery-powered Vespa...?
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Christini Technologies unveils AWD SuperMoto


The Christini AWD SuperMoto. Is AWD the next step forward in sportbike technology?
Pic: Motorcycle-USA

All-wheel-drive on motorcycles? Steve Christini has been at it for more than 10 years. The man really believes in the AWD concept and his company – Christini Technologies – has, over the years, been working tirelessly towards an AWD motorcycle that really works. And if the recently unveiled Christini SuperMoto is anything to go by, AWD motorcycles might just be getting ready to go mainstream.

The Christini SuperMoto prototype is actually a KTM 450 SX-F, with various aftermarket bits and the Christini AWD system. The Christini AWD is actually a kit that can be added to some Honda and KTM dirtbikes. It comprises of a purely mechanical (as opposed to hydraulic) system that transfers power to the front wheel. We’ll admit we don’t understand the system too well, but you can visit the Christini website here to read more about the mechanics of the AWD system.

We are more interested in what the AWD system does – it’s supposed to provide extra traction and stability, especially on dirtbikes and dual-purpose machines. Christni have also been working to fine-tune the system for streetbikes – in the few tests they’ve done so far, AWD is said to improve cornering speeds and stability during exiting fast bends.

We think AWD on bikes is pretty damn cool. Who knows what a Fireblade, GSX-R1000, R1 or 1198S will do with AWD? Heck, it may even allow ordinary riders to corner like Rossi & Co. Or maybe not. But whatever, this technology is one to watch out for in the future…!

Also see:
Cool concept: The Yamaha Air Tricker...
Ecosse ES1: Reinventing the sportsbike...
Riding impression: The supercharged, 180bhp Roehr 1250SC
Blast from the past: Kawasaki ZX-10 Turbo!
Motorcycle Speedway: Just how tough are you?
Memorable: The mid-1980s Honda VF1000R...

Elsewhere today:
KTM test 2WD bikes...
Here's something for those who want to ride in the snow...

2009 MotoGP: Ilmor to work on privateer Kawasaki ZX-RRs?


While Kawasaki will not provide any parts or assistance to Bartholemy's proposed privateer MotoGP outfit, Ilmor might step in with their expertise...

Kawasaki’s immediate future in MotoGP is still uncertain. Team Green’s MotoGP team boss, Michael Bartholemy is reportedly in Japan right now, trying to figure out whether Kawasaki can still participate in the 2009 MotoGP world championship. With Dorna threatening to hit Kawasaki with a fine of around US$28 million if they pull out of MotoGP (Kawasaki had earlier committed to staying in MotoGP till 2011 at least…), the beleaguered bike manufacturer may also be looking for a middle path that gives them a way out of this mess.

The ‘middle path’ that may get the required minimum of 19 bikes on the 2009 MotoGP grid could be that Bartholemy runs a private team with two Kawasaki ZX-RRs, which would be ridden by Marco Melandri and John Hopkins. However, Kawasaki will not provide any support, and parts, development and everything else will be handled by Bartholemy.

Kawasaki test rider, Olivier Jacque has already been testing the 2009 prototype ZX-RR. And with regard to the requirement of parts and development, it’s now being said that British engineering firm – Ilmor – could step in with their expertise.

Based in Northamptonshire in the UK, Ilmor came to MotoGP for a brief period in 2006 and 2007, with their own racebike. However, due to a lack of funds, the company shut down its MotoGP operations in March 2007. Now, with Kawasaki ZX-RR machines up for grabs, Ilmor could possibly be back in MotoGP, supplying technical backup to Bartholemy’s privateer outfit. An Ilmor was the very first 800cc MotoGP machine to come to MotoGP, when Garry McCoy rode against 990cc machines towards the end of the 2006 season. We don’t know if a Kawasaki-Ilmor privateer team would have any success against factory Honda, Yamaha and Ducati bikes, but it’ll at least keep Kawasaki in MotoGP.

Kawasaki’s final decision is expected later this week, so stay tuned for more on this…

Also see:
Massive collection of 2008 MotoGP wallpaper...
Fast past: Gary Nixon rides the Kawasaki ZX-RR...
Face-off: 2009 Yamaha R1 vs 1990s Yamaha YZR500...!
Classic: The 200mph NSU 500 Kompressor...
Memorable: The Laverda 750 Formula S
Marco 'Crazy Horse' Lucchinelli, 1981 500cc motorcycle GP racing world champ...
Team Nescafe replica Yamaha YZF750SP...

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Métisse will build Steve McQueen’s bike for you...
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Tuesday, January 20, 2009

2009 Yamaha R1 riding impressions


The 2009 Yamaha R1. The ride of your life...

With its MotoGP-derived technologies, the 2009 Yamaha YZF-R1 is supposed to be the hottest ticket to superbike nirvana this year. Some of the world’s motorcycle press have had the opportunity to ride The One, and here are some interesting excerpts from what they have to say:

‘All you need to know is, the new engine has transformed the R1 into one of the best sportsbikes I’ve ever ridden, and that’s praise indeed when you consider just how good the current Honda Fireblade is,’ says Michael Neeves at MCN. ‘Revving the engine for the first time, it’s hard to comprehend just how quickly the rev needle dances around the dial; it spins more like a two-stroke 500cc GP machine than a litre-sized road bike,’ he adds.

‘The way the R1 leaps out of corners is incredible. As soon as you’re ready to accelerate, the Yamaha surges forward like it’s powered by an industrial-strength electric motor – it’s just seamless, instant torque and power, and impossibly easy to control,’ says Neeves. ‘Honestly the R1 accelerates like it has a racing engine; it has V-twin levels of torque down low and screaming four-cylinder power up top. The howl from the engine at full throttle is exactly the same as Rossi’s M1; it’s like your very own MotoGP bike for the road,’ he adds.

About the new R1’s handling, Neeves says, ‘A new chassis helps the R1 feel much lighter than the old one, and it steers much quicker and more accurately. As always for Yamaha, the handling is nice and neutral, although probably not as ‘pointy’ or fast steering as the Fireblade. In one stroke, it makes every other sports bike out there seem a bit old and wheezy. Impressed isn’t the word.’
 
The 2009 Yamaha R1 on test...
At Motorcycle-USA, Steve Atlas is no less impressed with the R1. ‘The throttle response is unlike anything I have ever felt. So instantaneous and so precise, it caught me off guard during our first session at the 12-turn Eastern Creek Raceway. On more than one occasion I twisted the grip a bit too far while still at high levels of lean, spinning the street-spec rear tire and popping my butt a few inches off the seat when it hooked up. Wake up time! It's spot-on, in-your-face good,’ says Atlas. ‘Overall, the feeling of the engine truly is hard to describe as is the distinct sound. You still get the sense it’s an inline-four once the revs build high, but in the low rpm it feels almost like a well-tuned V-twin race bike, and in a way, sounds like one as well. Vibration is far from what you are used to as well, feeling somewhat like a traditional V8 car. The most amount of disturbance is right off idle low in the rpm, smoothing out as revs increase and becoming almost nonexistent at top-end – completely opposite of any inline-four we have ever ridden. Strange initially, but one quickly gets used to it,’ says Atlas. Regarding the handling, Atlas says, ‘Front-end confidence is greatly improved from last year due to the updated weight distribution, giving the rider far more confidence to push deeper and flick harder as the fork gives ample feedback. Once on its side, the R1 continually feels as if you can lean it further and further, quickly approaching elbow-dragging territory.’ However, Atlas discovers that the R1 is not without its shortcomings. ‘Brakes are still the weak point of the R-Uno. Despite the changes up front the lever feels a bit wooden throughout its pull, lacking the outright power of some of the competition. Where in this day and age using anything more than two fingers to stop is almost unheard of, on more than one occasion I was in deep enough to require the use of my entire hand, even running off the track into the grass once, something I haven’t done since… well, the last time I rode an R1. That being said, they are slightly better than the previous model,’ he says. Hmmm… apart from the brakes, it all sounds pretty impressive. We don’t know yet how the 2009 R1 will stack up against this year’s GSX-R1000, but we suppose it’ll be close. Let the 2009 superbike dogfights begin…

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