Thursday, December 17, 2009

BMW S1000RR takes on Japanese litre-class superbikes, and wins!

BMW S100RRBMW S100RRBMW S100RR

The BMW S1000RR goes up against the R1, Fireblade, GSX-R1000 and ZX-10R, and comes out on top! Pretty amazing...
Via MCN

...and now watch this!
image host

Wednesday, December 16, 2009

KTM 690 Duke R riding impression

2010 KTM 690 Duke R2010 KTM 690 Duke R2010 KTM 690 Duke R
KTM 690 Duke R - the best single-cylinder, 70bhp bike in the world...
2010 KTM 690 Duke R2010 KTM 690 Duke R2010 KTM 690 Duke R

Fitted with a single-cylinder 690cc engine that pumps out 70 horsepower, the 690 Duke R isn’t exactly the most glamorous motorcycle in the KTM line-up, but it could well be one of the most fun-to-ride bikes anywhere. With its light weight (148kg dry), high-spec suspension and slick six-speed gearbox, the little KTM is lean, lithe and sporty. Motociclismo recently had the opportunity to test the bike and here are some excerpts from what they have to say about the baby KTM:

The first KTM Duke 620 was launched back in 1994, primarily to meet the demand for such a bike in France, where some riders had already started to convert their motocross bikes into supermotards. The first Duke was one of the best performing bikes in its class, something which still holds true today for the latest 690 Duke.

With the 1999 Duke II, the 2008 690 Duke and the 2010 690 Duke R, the bike has become increasingly capable on the street and the newest model also looks strikingly beautiful. KTM uses a somewhat similar recipe with all its ‘R’ models – a slight increase in engine performance, uprated brake and suspension components and, of course, that black-white-and-orange paintjob.

On the twisty Alpine roads on the outskirts of Nice, in France, the 690 Duke R immediately feels very light and easy to ride. And it’s not just very agile – it’s also very stable. With its stiff steel tube trellis frame, cast aluminium swingarm and uprated front fork, the Duke R stays quite planted even at its top speed of around 200km/h.

On bumpy roads with small patches of snow and ice, the Duke R doesn’t lose its composure even at higher speeds. The brakes, too, work very well – the single 320mm disc with Brembo radial-mount four-piston callipers at the front, and 240mm rear disc offer so much stopping power that you actually need some time to get used to these brakes.

The bike is comfortable to ride and the wide handlebars give you a lot of space to move around. If it weren’t for the lack of wind protection, you could actually use this bike for long distance trips.

For the Duke R, KTM have increased the displacement of their single-cylinder engine from 654cc to 690cc and power output has gone up from 65bhp to 70bhp. And yes, you can feel the difference – the new bike feels more responsive than the basic 690 Duke. There’s still not much power up to 2,000rpm but things are perfect once you cross that figure. The engine feels stronger and more rev-happy than you’d expect a single-cylinder engine to be, and it doesn’t vibrate much either. Honestly, you just can’t ask more of a machine with a 690cc single-cylinder engine!

The 690 Duke R costs 8,890 euros (a mere 300 euros more than the standard 690 Duke) and will be available in March 2010.

2010 KTM 690 Duke R: Tech Specs

Engine: Fuel-injected, liquid-cooled, single-cylinder 690cc
Power: 70bhp@7,500rpm
Torque: 70Nm@5,500rpm
Gearbox: Six-speed
Suspension: 48mm USD fork, monoshock, both three-way adjustable
Brakes: Single 320mm disc with four-piston radial-mount callipers (front), 240mm rear disc
Tyres: 120/70-17 (front), 160/60-17 (rear)
Fuel tank: 13.5L
Dry weight: 148kg


A video of the KTM 690 Duke R. Yes, the bike looks good...

Via Motociclismo

Tuesday, December 15, 2009

Aprilia RSV4 R riding impression

Apriila RSV4 RApriila RSV4 RApriila RSV4 R
Though it's 5kg heavier than the Factory, the Aprilia RSV4 R still has the same 180bhp V4 engine and ride-by-wire electronics. How bad can it be...
Apriila RSV4 RApriila RSV4 RApriila RSV4 R

For those who can live with Showa/Sachs (instead of Ohlins) suspension, aluminium (instead of magnesium) components, plastic (instead of carbonfibre) parts in the bodywork, and a non-adjustable chassis (instead of one that allows you to change the swingarm’s pivot point, steering head angle and even the engine position…), the Aprilia RSV4 R is probably a brilliant deal. You still get the same sharp styling, the same 180bhp V4 engine, and the same ride-by-wire electronics as the higher-spec RSV4 Factory, but at a price that’s about 25% lower.

MotorBox recently had the opportunity to test ride the RSV4 R at the Estoril circuit, in Portugal, and here are some excerpts from what they have to say about the bike:

Aprilia aim to sell around 2,000 units of the RSV4 in Europe in 2010, so launching a ‘cheaper’ version of the RSV4 Factory was probably a must, in order to achieve those sales figures. And for Aprilia fans who want a bike that can work on the track as well as on the street, the RSV4 R is just great, because it still retains most of the best bits of the Factory version.

The R version’s 65-degree V4 remains unchanged and still produces the full 180bhp at 12,500rpm – the same as the RSV4 Factory. Dual injectors per cylinder, 48mm throttle bodies, ride-by-wire electronics, and tri-mode mapping – it’s all there. And while the chassis doesn’t permit you to change the engine’s position or alter the swingarm pivot, it’s still beautifully finished, and the 43mm Showa fork and Sachs shock are fully adjustable.

At 184kg dry, the RSV4 R is 5kg heavier than the Factory, but that makes little difference to the bike’s performance. With Aprilia’s own test riders on board, the RSV4 R laps the Mugello circuit within a few 10ths of a second of the Factory’s lap times. The R’s very ‘front-endy’ riding position is also similar to the Factory’s, though in real-world riding the Factory feels a bit more ‘edgy’ and aggressive, responding to the rider’s inputs with a tad more urgency.

A lot of people may actually like the RSV4 R more than the Factory, since the former is more street-friendly, while the latter is definitely a bit more track-oriented. The two bikes have their own unique personalities – the R is a bit more stable under hard braking while the Factory accelerates out of corners harder.


The RSV4 R definitely doesn't need to make any excuses for its performance...

In the end, the Factory is a ferret and in terms of handling, remains the absolute benchmark in its segment. The RSV4 Factory is small, slim and compact, changes direction very quickly and often feels like a 600 in the way it handles. The R model makes you work a bit harder to go as fast, but ultimately the R is also a bit easier to control than the rather more explosive Factory.

The BMW S1000RR might be bit more powerful, but the Aprilia’s V4 sounds fantastic and goes very, very hard. It also delivers its power across a wide rev range, though the Factory’s engine is happy revving all the way up to 14,000rpm while the R’s engine stops a few hundred revs before that.

Coming to the two bikes’ ride-by-wire electronics, the R’s electronics seem to work a bit better than the Factory’s, which is understandable since Aprilia have had a few months to fine-tune and optimise the system. The R’s V4 is blessed with perfect fuel-injection and even its gearbox feels just a bit smoother than the Factory’s. The only thing we’d like changed is low-rpm response in ‘Track’ mode, which is currently a bit too aggressive. Milder response in the first quarter opening of the throttle would probably work better.

Finally, the RSV4 R’s strength lies in the disarming simplicity with which it allows you to go so fast. That V4 makes a scary amount of power, but Aprilia have managed to engineer a package that lets you actually use all that power rather. The RSV4 R is bike that’s perfectly balanced – focused on performance and yet easy to ride – and as a package, it works very well indeed. This was Japanese litre-bike territory at one time, but Aprilia engineers have produced a bike that’s ready to take on the world’s best!

Here are some pics of the Aprilia RSV4, which you'll probably like very much...   ;-)


And here, from Gizmag, is a very comprehensive road test video of the Aprilia RSV4 R

More RSV4 R action...

For the original article, please visit the
MotorBox website here

Share It