Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Love, Speed and Loss: Remembering Kim Newcombe


Kim Newcombe finished second in the 1973 500cc motorcycle GP racing world championship, on a Konig motorcycle which he worked on himself...

Produced by Visionary Film and TV Ltd. and directed by Justin Pemberton, Love, Speed and Loss is a documentary about motorcycle racer Kim Newcombe, who raced a König motorcycle in the 500cc GPs in the 1970s. Newcombe was killed while racing in 1973, the same year which also claimed the lives of two other motorcycle racers – Renzo Pasolini and Jarno Saarinen. Newcombe finished second (posthumously) in that year's 500cc motorcycle GP racing world championship, which was won by Phil Read.

Born in 1944 in the town of Nelson, in New Zealand, Kim Newcombe moved to Australia in 1963 and subsequently to Europe in 1968. Along with fellow racer, John Dodds, he developed a racing motorcycle using a four-cylinder, two-stroke, liquid-cooled boat engine designed by Dieter König. The engine was mated to a Manx Norton’s gearbox and clutch.

Coming back to the film, Love, Speed and Loss is an in-depth look at Newcombe’s life and features racing footage, interviews with Newcombe’s wife Janeen and much more. It won the best documentary award at the 2007 Qantas TV Awards, and Air NZ Screen Awards for best documentary, directing, and editing.

This is a 75-minute documentary and you can watch the first part right here (see below). The other three parts can also be seen online, at the NZ On Screen website here


This is the first part of the four-part documentary, Love, Speed and Loss. The other three parts are also available online here

Pics: Ozebook, more details: Motorcycling Australia

2 comments:

DickWormley said...

This is an excellent movie and well worth watching. Newcombe was a classic kiwi DIY racer who got himself to the top of the sport with determination and ingenuity. It includes some classic racing footage and a real insight into paddock life in that era all shot by his wife. An amazing story.

Anonymous said...

Saw this film in a cinema in Potsdam in German language, as the Newcombes lived in Berlin the theatre was full of baby-boomers whos seemed to already know the story! Yet he was relatively unknown back in home country I believe? Well worth watching this film.

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