Saturday, February 06, 2010

Rossi vs Lorenzo: The rivalry builds…


Lorenzo will no longer benefit from Rossi's development work...

Reigning MotoGP world champ Valentino Rossi and his team mate Jorge Lorenzo will no longer share development data for their YZR-M1 bikes. ‘Considering the fact that these two riders are the main rivals for the MotoGP championship, we have decided to respect this competition internally and to respect their own ways to race and to approach the competition,’ said Davide Brivio, Rossi’s team manager.

‘At Yamaha, engineers can compare data and information, but the two teams inside the garage can work more independently from a technical point of view,’ said Brivio. ‘Each team has their own data. You can't see the other team's data. Only Yamaha engineers can see all the data and then feed it back to both riders,’ added Fiat Yamaha team director, Masahiko Nakajima.

‘I think that Jorge – already in 2008 but especially last year – demonstrated great speed and also a good attitude to fix and set-up the bike. Now he has two years in MotoGP so everybody in the team agreed that it is possible to make his own way,’ said Rossi. ‘I don't have anything to comment on this,’ said Lorenzo, implying that he may not be entirely happy with this development. Which is only to be expected - Jeremy Burgess had made it clear last year that it was Rossi who's entirely responsible for developing the race-winning Yamaha YZR-M1.

Things are different with the Tech3 Yamaha team in that Ben Spies and Colin Edwards will continue to share all data. But then neither of those riders is expected to be in the hunt for the 2010 MotoGP world championship. Rossi, of course, is taking things very seriously and has said he won’t be offering any advice or tips to friend and fellow Italian Marco Simoncelli, who comes to MotoGP this year with Gresini Honda. ‘When Marco signed for MotoGP, the tips are finished,’ said Rossi. ‘I have a good relationship with him and I've seen him growing up to be a world champion, but now he's a rival, like the others,’ added The Doctor.

Via Crash.net

Friday, February 05, 2010

2010 Yamaha R6 riding impression


The 2010 Yamaha R6 - a bit less noisy and a bit more civilized than its predecessor...

For some time now, the Yamaha R6 has been the most hard-edged, track-oriented supersports 600 around. For 2010, Yamaha have tempered down the bike and made it more civilized and easier to ride on the street. Here are some excerpts from what Motociclismo have to say about the machine:

Back in 2005, the Yamaha YZF-R6 was the first Japanese sportsbike to be fitted with a short, compact exhaust system mounted on one side of bike rather than under the seat. For 2010, this exhaust system has grown in length, probably in order to allow the bike to comply with new noise and emissions regulations. And while it’s now quieter, the rest of the machine remains the same – sharp as a knife.

According to Yamaha, the R6’s engine has been revised for better power delivery at lower revs. Indeed, because of the new exhaust, air filter and fuel-injection mapping, the new R6 actually has 5bhp less than its predecessor. It’s also a bit slower, taking 9.8 seconds for the zero to 200km/h sprint, while the 2009 bike used to do it in 9.7 seconds. Of course, on the street this difference in performance is barely noticeable.

In terms of handling, the 2010 R6 remains agile as ever and makes you feel like a real racer on your favourite stretch of twisty road. On smooth surfaces, the bike’s very firm suspension works well, but the handling tends to deteriorate on bumpy roads, with the rear end bouncing around a fair bit. The brakes, however, with a four-piston calliper set-up at the front, remain as good as ever.

In conclusion, the 2010 Yamaha YZF-R6 remains one of the most technologically advanced supersport machines. Its engine is still explosive and with its excellent chassis, the little Yamaha is simply an incredible ride. The riding position is a bit too extreme for the street and clutch feel could have been improved, but the bike is certainly less noisy and more civilized than the 2009 model, making it more suitable for everyday use. And for that, we must applaud Yamaha…

For the original article, please visit Motociclismo

Thursday, February 04, 2010

2010 Valentino Rossi unveiled in Sepang, Malaysia

Valentino Rossi2010 Yamaha YZR-M1
Will Rossi win his 8th MotoGP world championship this year? We certainly hope he will...

The Fiat Yamaha MotoGP Team today unveiled the 2010-spec version of seven-time MotoGP world champion, Valentino Rossi, at the Sepang circuit in Malaysia. Rossi’s bike, the 2010 Yamaha YZR-M1 was also displayed alongside the rider.

‘On the 16th of February, I will be 31. I will be a little older [but] I always try to be at the top of my shape, improving and trying to adapt to the new bike. You always need to adapt yourself to the new bike, to the new regulation. If you think you are at the top of your performance, it is a big problem! Every season has its own story, it is more and more difficult and you always have to be faster. I will try again, as usual,’ said Rossi.

‘It is very difficult to say now who will be the hardest rival this year. I think all of them are on the same level, it is difficult to beat any of them. They are very strong riders, they can be fast on every track and condition and through the entire season and they are all capable of winning the championship. The 2010 bikes will make the difference, but I think all three riders [Casey Stoner, Jorge Lorenzo and Dani Pedrosa] will be the more difficult to be beaten,’ said The Doctor, speaking about his rivals.

‘In order to improve the 2010 M1, we have decided to focus on two aspects. Our aim is to develop a more stable bike, with more grip. The second direction, which is the most important, is the engine. We need more horsepower, despite the new rule that limits the number of engines through the season. We need more power and longer life of the engine. This will not be easy for Yamaha, but I know that they have been working very hard on this,’ said Rossi, speaking about the 2010 Yamaha MotoGP racebike.

2010 Yamaha YZR-M12010 Yamaha YZR-M1

2010 Yamaha YZR-M1: Tech Specs

Engine: Liquid-cooled crossplane crankshaft 800cc inline-four
Power: More than 200bhp
Top speed: Above 320km/h
Gearbox: Six-speed cassette-type, with alternative gear ratios
Chassis: Aluminium twin tube delta box, multi-adjustable steering geometry / wheelbase / ride height, aluminium swingarm
Supension: Ohlins USD forks and Ohlins rear shock, all
adjustable for pre-load, high and low-speed compression and rebound damping
Wheels: Marchesini 16.5-inch
Tyres: Bridgestone, 16.5-inch, available as slick, intermediate, wet and hand-cut
Brakes: Brembo, twin 320mm carbon front discs, two four-piston callipers, single 220mm stainless steel rear disc, twin-piston calliper
Weight: 150kg

Note: The new Jorge Lorenzo, with minor revisions for 2010, was also unveiled at Sepang. Changes may include mildly reduced cockiness and arrogance, and slightly enhanced maturity.

Monday, February 01, 2010

Lambretta to return to 125cc motorcycle world championship racing

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Lambretta will make a comeback to top-flight racing after almost 60 years...

Legendary Italian brand Lambretta, which is expected to launch an all-new range of scooters (and motorcycles?) this year, is also making a comeback to motorcycle racing. Their racing team – Lambretta Reparto Corse – will participate in this year’s 125cc world championship. The last time Lambretta went racing at this level was in the early-1950s, when the V-twin-engined Lambretta 250 GP racer competed in the 250cc world championship.

Lambretta Reparto Corse will operate out of Engines Engineering’s workshops in Bologna, Italy. ‘It’s is a wonderful day for Lambretta and one we’ve been working towards for nearly two years. We’re delighted to be back on the racetrack and to compete in such an exciting and expanding sport. It’ll be fun to compete with the big boys and see what happens,’ says Lambretta’s marketing director, John Scully.

Scully added that Lambretta sees its involvement in racing as a way for its technical people to develop better products for the street.

Via MotoGP




Some pics for fans of older Lambys...
Pics: Cyberium

Sunday, January 31, 2010

Bombay Blues: 1969 Royal Enfield Bullet 350 café racer


That number 69 has nothing to do with Joshua being a fan of Nicky Hayden. No, the number refers to a certain position that the man prefers...

The very cool Royal Enfield Bullet 350-based café racer you see here has been put together by Joshua, who’s based in Bombay, India. Twenty-six year old Joshua lives an interesting life – he likes flying, has a commercial pilot’s license and he’s worked with various car and motorcycle magazines in India. He’s an ardent motorcycle enthusiast, owns and rides various motorcycles and since he’s also very handy with tools, he tweaks, tunes and maintains all his bikes himself.

For building this café racer, Joshua used his father’s 1969-model Royal Enfield Bullet 350. ‘It's about time people say f*** fenders, fairing and fat tyres and ask for more. I decided to build something that was simple yet made a statement and was a little out of the box,’ he says.

‘I've started to get obsessed with flat trackers. They can get pretty trick and make you look super cool when you stick your leg out and go sideways. As for my favourite motorcycle of all time, I can't really put my finger on it. A lot of racing strokers from the 60s and 70s are right up there but if it's a more modern motorcycle, I'd have to say Deus Ex Machina's Triumph Thruxton would definitely be on top,’ says Joshua, providing a hint at what his next project bike might be…

For those want to convert their RE Bullet into something that looks exactly like Josh’s café racer, the man is now offering a kit that includes lightweight GRP body parts (tank and seat cowl with integrated seat), adjustable Clubman type handlebar, spring loaded rearset with brake and gear linkages, LED parking lamp integrated in the headlamp dome, LED taillamp, GoldStar replica exhaust, fork brace, front fender and race plates. For pricing and other details, write to Joshua on joshuacrasto@gmail.com

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