Saturday, November 27, 2010

2011 Confederate C3 X132 Hellcat: Orders now being taken

2011 Confederate C3 X132 Hellcat 2011 Confederate C3 X132 Hellcat 2011 Confederate C3 X132 Hellcat 2011 Confederate C3 X132 Hellcat 2011 Confederate C3 X132 Hellcat 2011 Confederate C3 X132 Hellcat
Confederate claim that the C3 X132's 2.2-litre engine makes "sufficient" horsepower. Well, for the $45,000 which the bike costs, we hope "sufficient" is how they spell 200bhp...

For those with US$45,000 to blow on a high-tech, beautifully made, super-exclusive muscle-cruiser, you can now line up outside Confederate Motorcycles’ office and place an order for the new C3 X132 Hellcat. An upfront payment of US$2,250 will secure a C3 X132 for your garage and your bike will be delivered by no later than the end of December 2011. Only 150 units of this machine will be built and 22 of those have already been booked, so your time starts now.

What, exactly, do you get for your $45,000? You get a bike that’s fitted with a 2,200cc twin-cylinder S&S Cycle engine that produces 197Nm of torque and “sufficient” (yep, that’s what they claim) horsepower. The powertrain casing is carved from a single-piece, 180-kilo block of aircraft-grade aluminium, the transmission is a five-speed close-ratio unit and final drive is via chain. There’s a 50mm fork at the front and Racetech monoshock at the back, both ends being fully adjustable for low- and high-speed compression and rebound damping.

Other bits on the 2011 Confederate C3 X132 Hellcat include Brembo brakes with carbon-ceramic rotors and four-piston monobloc callipers, 17-inch carbonfibre wheels, high-intensity discharge (HID) headlamp and LED taillamp. The bike will be available in ‘Fighter’ and ‘Roadster’ versions, both of which will have different ergonomics.

Want to buy a Hellcat C3 X132? Go here

Friday, November 26, 2010

Kevin Carmichael: “The 2011 Triumph Speed Triple is easier to drift…”

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If you can ride even has as well as Kevin Carmichael, the 2011 Triumph Speed Triple may well be the best sportsbike in the world for you...!

For their January 2011 issue, Motorcycle Sport & Leisure spoke to Triumph’s stunt rider Kevin Carmichael and asked him what he thinks of the 2011 Speed Triple. Here are some excerpts from what Kevin had to say about the machine:

On how the 2011 Speed Triple compares with its predecessor

All around, it’s a much better bike. You can definitely feel more weight up at the front end, which enhances the bike’s handling abilities. The new weight distribution also helps me to perform stunts and control them; it’s definitely made drifting the machine a lot easier. Overall, you can still tell the bike’s a Speed Triple but it just seems a lot more focused.

On how the 2011 Speed Triple compares to other bikes for stunt riding

The Street Triple is undoubtedly the best stunt bike in the world and the new Speed Triple has a similar feel to the Street Triple, only with a little more power and slightly more weight. The brakes are phenomenal and the smooth, linear power delivery makes life so much easier. There’s a direct correlation between the throttle and the rear wheel, which is something that so many other bikes lack. Basically, it’s a world class machine and other manufacturers are really going to struggle to compete with it.

On how his stunt bike will be different from the stock machine

It will be exactly the same as the production model. I’ll even keep the lights in place because the weight over the front end really aids the performance. That’s a testament to how fantastic a machine this new bike is. I love it!

These excerpts are from the January 2011 issue of Motorcycle Sport & Leisure magazine. Please visit their website here


Kevin Carmichael shows his stuff on the old Speed Triple...

Tuesday, November 23, 2010

Gisele Bündchen goes Max Max for DT

Gisele Bündchen Gisele Bündchen Gisele Bündchen Gisele Bündchen Gisele Bündchen Gisele Bündchen
Brazilian supermodel Gisele Bündchen gets on a bike for DT magazine...

Brazilian supermodel Gisele Bündchen has gone all Mad Max for DT magazine, who’ve featured Ms Bündchen in their October 2010 issue. Born in 1980, Gisele is the highest-paid model in the world and with about US$150 million in her bank account, the sixteenth richest woman in the entertainment industry.

Shot with Giese astride a Harley, the DT feature was photographed by Mario Testino, who seems to have gone for a stylised version of the grungy, post-apocalyptic look used in those Mad Max movies that we loved so much. We like the pics, though we do wish Mario had shot pics of Gisele riding an S1000RR or RSV4 Factory rather than a Harley. Next time, maybe...?  :-)

Monday, November 22, 2010

Motorcycle Photography: What it takes

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'Taking images of objects moving at speeds of up to 320km/h goes beyond what textbooks teach about panning,' says pro photographer Chris Martin...

Like us, you probably enjoy watching. Glorious, beautifully shot, high-resolution photographs of the fast motorcycles we love so much, that is. But we’ll admit we don’t often think about the effort, perseverance and sheer talent that goes into getting those photographs.

For their October 2010 issue, Master Photography magazine caught up with British photographer Chris Martin, who’s been shooting motorcycles as a professional for more than a decade. He’s shot pictures at various MotoGP races around the world, as well as BSB and WSBK events. He was the official team photographer for the Rizla Suzuki British Superbikes team for three years and official photographer for other prominent motorcycle racing teams as well.

‘As with other forms of photography, moving position can make all the difference to the composition and lighting,’ says Chris. ‘Taking images of objects moving at speeds of up to 320km/h goes beyond what textbooks teach about panning. I have found myself in situations where wheels and backgrounds are still blurred even when using shutter speeds in excess of 1/1000th of a second,’ he adds.

‘Another challenge is hand holding long telephoto lenses. I use a monopod ocassionaly but it makes it difficult to duck quickly,’ says Chris. ‘Most of my images were shot in raw mode and slightly overexposed to preserve shadow detail. The exposure was pulled back in raw conversion and the resulting JPEG was given a boost in the shadows, with less chance of noise creeping in, which gives the images more dynamic range,’ he concludes.

Umm… we’ll admit that we do all our photography (whatever little there is, of it…) with a Sony Cybershot, in full-automatic ‘Program’ mode. So we don’t completely understand what Chris is talking about. But we suppose most of it means that shooting good pictures of bikes travelling at very high speeds is bloody hard work. We’ll remember that and the next time we look at a photograph of The Doctor pulling a wheelie at 200km/h, we’ll appreciate the skill and the hard work of the photographer who took that photograph.

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