Friday, July 08, 2011

Kevin Schwantz on the Aprilia RSV4 Factory: "It feels pretty good to me!"


Between the BMW S1000RR, MV Agusta F4 and the Aprilia RSV4 Factory, Schwantz says the Italian V4 engine is the best of the bunch...

The Aprilia RSV4 Factory APRC is pretty much the current King of litre-class superbikes. Sure, the BMW S1000RR has an even more powerful engine and the Kawasaki ZX-10R’s electronics are said to be a bit more sophisticated, but as an overall package, the RSV4 is hard to beat. We love its styling, compact size and shrieking V4 engine. And with Maxi Biaggi having won the 2010 World Superbikes championship aboard the RSV4, the Aprilia now also has unbeatable racing pedigree.

In fact, the RSV4 is so good, even Kevin Schwantz is impressed. The 1993 500cc motorcycle GP racing world champ tested the Aprilia, alongside the S1000RR and MV Agusta F4, for Bike magazine’s October issue last year. And according to Mr 34, the RSV4 is the pick of the bunch. Here are some excerpts from what Schwantz had to say about the RSV4:

“It’s a different animal to the BMW S1000RR. Completely different and much more nimble in its input. The BMW feels bigger, heavier, wider. But on this thing, the direction changes… it just wants to fall right into the centre of the corner and keep on turning. You can ride it further into the corners and it still wants to come right back on itself, even with the gas turned on. Yet it’s still dead stable on the brakes.”

“I think the V4 is the best motor of the three [RSV4, S1000RR and MV F4]. Doesn’t have the outright power that the BMW has and it doesn’t really run behind the MV either in straight line speed – even in the draft I can get close but not make it last, because it makes a few bike lengths every gear. But the Aprilia has nice, usable power and a wide powerband. It goes up to 14,000rpm and still feels like it’s pulling plenty strong up there, and it’s still manageable.”

Kevin went on to compare the Aprilia RSV4 with Ducati's 2007 MotoGP bike, saying that the two machines felt similar in terms of handling on the limit and in their cornering abilities. “Even when it’s stopping, it’s still easy to commit to a corner. Could be the forks, geometry, engine position. I’m not sure what it is exactly – it’s probably a combination of all of them. But it feels pretty good to me,” said Schwantz.

We feel if the bike felt ‘pretty good’ to Schwantz, the RSV4 should be plenty good for everyone else. We love the Aprilia so much and we can’t stop fawning all over it. Just dreaming of the day when we’ll have $21,000 to spend, so we can walk into an Aprilia showroom and actually buy an RSV4 Factory. Someday, we suppose… :-)

Kevin Schwantz rode and tested the Aprilia RSV4 for the UK-based Bike, the best motorcycle magazine in the world...


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Kevin Schwantz says the RSV4 is 'pretty good,' which probably means it's also good enough for the rest of us. We want one so much...
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