Friday, April 13, 2012

zecOO: Electric low-rider from Japan

zecOO electric low-rider
We think Nezu san (above) has done a pretty good job with the zecOO
zecOO electric low-rider zecOO electric low-rider zecOO electric low-rider

Designed by Kota Nezu, of Znug Design, the zecOO is an electric low-rider that may go into limited production later this year. The battery-powered zecOO’s electric motor produces 21kW and 65Nm of torque and the bike weighs 245kg dry. With its ‘vertical twin frame,’ single-side front and rear swingarms, hub-centre steering and spacecraft-like bodywork, the zecOO looks quite funky. Riding on 18-inch wheels, shod with 180/55 (front) and 240/40 (rear) tyres, this low-rider certainly scores on the style front. More information on the official website

Pics: Kazunobu Yamada

2012 Yoshimura Limited Edition GSX-R1000, the stuff our fantasies are made of!

2012 Yoshimura Limited Edition Suzuki GSX-R
The Yoshimura GSX-Rs look fabulous!
2012 Yoshimura Limited Edition Suzuki GSX-R 2012 Yoshimura Limited Edition Suzuki GSX-R 2012 Yoshimura Limited Edition Suzuki GSX-R

Yoshimura have announced their new Limited Edition Suzuki GSX-R1000, GSX-R750 and GSX-R600, which get a custom paintjob, Yoshimura R-77 Carbonfibre exhaust slip-ons (EPA noise-compliant) and a selection of CNC-machined aluminium parts, including case savers, chassis protectors, axle adjuster blocks, race stand stoppers, bar ends and an engine plug kit. Each bike also gets an individually numbered Limited Edition badge.

We are big fans of Yoshimura and while the 750 and 600 are also pretty cool, we’ll admit the Yoshimura GSX-R1000 is the bike of our dreams, our Sunday morning fantasies. More information on these bikes, on the Yoshimura website

Monday, April 09, 2012

Brembo: MotoGP vs F1, and the future of braking

MotoGP
MotoGP riders do it with one or two fingers, while F1 drivers need a whole leg...
MotoGP MotoGP MotoGP

What goes, must also stop. And we suppose what goes hard must stop harder, if anything. Which is where Brembo come in – their braking systems are responsible for stopping duties on fast machines in various kinds of motorsport, including F1, WRC, World Superbikes and MotoGP. In their May 2012 issue Fast Bikes magazine have taken an in-depth look at Brembo and the high-tech engineering that goes into building some of the best, most advanced braking systems in the world. Especially interesting is a snippet of Fast Bikes’ conversation with Roberto Pellegrini, Retail and Road Performance Motorbike Market Manager, Brembo Racing, where Pellegrini talks about the differences between braking set-ups in F1 and MotoGP. Here are some excerpts from what he had to say:

‘The Brembo calipers used in MotoGP and F1 are actually very similar – the only major difference is that the bikes use four pistons and the cars, six pistons per caliper. Both calipers are constructed from a lithium-aluminium alloy in a one-piece monobloc design, with titanium pistons, and both are radially mounted. I can’t tell you the sizes of the pistons – that’s a secret – but they are pretty similar. The big differences are the pressure and the clamping forces created,’ says Pellegrini.

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