Confederate Motorcycles

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Confederate Motorcycles, Inc. was formed on April 2, 1991

with the goal to create handcrafted street motorcycles of unsurpassed structure and quality, utilizing American industrial and mechanical design in its purest and most organic form. Headquartered in Abita Springs, Louisiana, Confederate has become the premier manufacturer of high-end, high-performance, American motorcycles for the connoisseur who will have only the best and the fastest.

The Formative Years

The first few years were invested in due diligence researching the top engineering and fabrication talent to assist our design team in creating the new line of Confederate machines. The company moved to the

San Francisco Bay area to refine the chassis and power train mounting system that would become the foundation for the new line of Confederate machines. From a clean sheet of paper, the new motorcycle was designed over an eighteen-month period.

Birth of a New Machine

During March of 1994, operations were relocated to a 6,000 square foot prototype shop in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. On November 11, 1994, Veteran's Day, our first motorcycle was fired up. The ride proved everything we had hoped for. It possessed world class chassis dynamics. But there was something more. Something hard to define, yet easily felt. The bike had All-American character.

Refining The Dream

In the summer and fall of 1996, as a small batch craft oriented builder, tooling for 500 machines was committed and manufactured. Beginning production in model year 1997 with but 15 machines, sales grew at an annualized 75% rate. Each of our 1st generation machines has been sold.

Theres No Place Like Home

On July 4, 1998, Confederate Motorcycles, Inc. moved into its own climate-controlled 38,000 square foot manufacturing facility, located in a rural community 30 miles north of New Orleans. The Company has in place all equipment, including mills, lathes, frame jigs, part jigs, welders, tool and dye equipment, a power bender and assembly stations.

Perfecting The Process

For our second generation Confederate Hellcatά all new proprietary tooling has been manufactured to assure the highest handmade quality possible.

Patented Technology

On January 12, 1999, H. Matthew Chambers was issued US patent number 5,857,538 covering 20 claims. The Companys products incorporate this patented technology to create traditional high-end American motorcycles of unsurpassed performance, styling and quality. Aside from uniquely classic aesthetic qualities, what sets our motorcycles apart from the competition is absolute power --train and chassis stiffness, huge street power, accurate and precise steering and handling, powerful braking, and world-class ride control.

Vengeance Motorcycles

Vengeance and Fender team up to benefit Kids Rock Free

CORONA, CA - APRIL 25, 2005

Update: The ride from the new factory to the Fender museum was a blast. We had Ted Metcalf and Jim Overman among others from the factory staff ride along with us. Fender put on a great event with hot rods, bikes, food, music and fun. If you've never visited the Fender Museum in Corona, CA, it really cool. The exhibits and displays are awesome featuring guitars and interactive presentations from a who's who of electronic guitar music. Fender has another event planned in the fall and we are looking forward to attending again!

Ride, Roll & Rock with Vengeance & Fender Sunday June 12. All riders are invited to meet at the Vengeance factory in Mira Loma, CA at 9:00-10:00 am for an ԯpen houseԠtour. The ride will leave at 10:30 from the factory and conclude at the Ԓolling for KidsԠcelebration in Corona, CA starting at 12 noon.

Open to the Public, Kids are Invited to Attend!

Celebrity Guests... Bands... Food... Raffles... Trophies

The "Rolling for Kids" event is a family-friendly street fair with a custom motorcycle and car show downtown Corona. The event will include a full day of live entertainment and even a few surprise "friends of Fender" musicians. The proceeds from this event benefit the Fender Museum's 'Kids Rock Free' music programs.

Car & Motorcycle Show

$35 Entry fee includes a lanyard and a Fender T-Shirt. The first 100 pre-registered also receive a Fender Goodie Bag. Open to all Motorcycles, Street Rods, Muscle Cars, Classics, Trucks, Antiques, Tuner Cars and Sports Cars! All proceeds benefit Kids Rock Free music education.

All riders participating in the Vengeance ride will have premier parking inside the show in front of the Vengeance show rig and will be eligible to compete for the Vengeance 'Best of Show' owners award.

Indian Motorcycle – Americaӳ First Motorcycle

Apr 24, 2002 - Apr 28, 2002

Laughlin, NV

Always a sold out event, more than 50,000 bikers enjoy top name entertainment, drill team events, a poker run, displays, competitions and vendors galore in the Westӳ largest ride-in bike rally.

Come test-ride the full line of 2002 Indian motorcycles including the Chief, featuring the all-new Powerplus 100 engine! Demo Ride Hours:

April 25 - 27, 9:00am - 4:30pm

Indian Motorcycle Display at the River Palms Resort & Casino

Rock out with Branscombe Richmond and the Renegade Posse at the Camel Roadhouse Friday and Saturday at 7:30pm.

Attention all Indian Motorcycle Riders!

Join Indian CEO Frank O'Connell, Branscombe Richmond and the Indian Riders Group Saturday, April 27th for a picturesque ride through the Arizona desert to Kingman.

Ride registration begins at 9:00am and will depart at 10:00am from the Indian display at the River Palms. All makes and models are welcome!

Honda Motorcycles Racing – Motocross

The Roberts family is to motorcycle racing what the Andrettis and Unsers are to automobile racing. Kenny Roberts Sr. won the AMA Grand National Championship at 21 years old, making him the youngest rider to have won that title. He took his first of three 500 Grand Prix road racing world championships when he was 26. His son Kenny Jr. won the 2001 500 GP title at the age of 27. Youngest son Kurtis Roberts was racing in Europe at the age of 17. He rode the 250 GP class at 18. He won his first AMA title in the Formula Xtreme class while riding for the Erion team at 20. Last year, at 21, he won the Formula Xtreme title a second consecutive time and also took the 600 SuperSport championship.

You see a pattern here? One could argue that genetics makes the Roberts clan superior road racers, but that shortchanges them. Junior and Kurtis grew up on their father's ranch in Hickman, California, sliding around on Honda XRٱ00s with road-racing legends such as Wayne Rainey, Eddie Lawson, John Kocinski and Bubba Shobert, and have worked as hard as any of them for their success. The thing is, Kurtis started road racing in GPs earlier than his father or older brother and already has more titles than either of them at the same age. There are those who say the youngest Roberts could very well be the best.

The year after Kurtis Roberts came home from Europe, he joined the Erion team and has been with them ever since. He's progressed steadily and with remarkable speed, going from second in points in the AMA's 250 GP class to his Formula Xtreme title in 1999 to his double titles in 2000. Obviously there's good chemistry between him and the team.

"There are a lot of advantages to being on the Erion team," he says. "Honda is committed to building the best bikes, and the Erion team is really a unique group of people. They work together as a team. We win as a team, and we lose as a team. And that's very important."

For 2001, Roberts will defend his 600 title aboard Honda's new CBR600F4i, and will step up to ride the premier road-race class in the United States, AMA Superbike, on Honda's RC51 V-twin weapon.

Now, some riders might be more circumspect about their freshman year in the Superbike class, but not Roberts. He wants to win the title. And he's got some advantages that might help him do it. First off, he knows how to ride mega-horsepower motorcycles, having mastered the Erion team's snorting, tire-smoking Formula Xtreme weapons. Second, Roberts has been consistently quick when he's ridden the RC51. On several occasions last year he posted quicker times than anyone in the field.

"The first time I ever sat on the RC51 I was on pole on the thing the first day," Roberts says. "So I know I'm fast on the bike."

"I was always better on bigger bikes. Big bikes suit my style. I can slide them and do whatever I want with them better than I can on a 600." And we all know just how well he rides a 600.

"I want to win two more championships," he says. "I want to win the 600 race at Daytona again, and continue on from there like I did last year. And, you know, I'd love to win Superbike races and that championship, all of which I think are attainable."

Such goals certainly seem within his reachespecially when he talks about what he learned last season with a degree of maturity that should worry his competitors.

"I need to stop trying to lead every lap," he says. "And I don't need to win every race. Trying to win them all last year really blew out three or four 600 races which we probably could have won.

"I've just got to let things come to me rather than make them happen all the time. Like Road Atlanta, for instance. I tried to make too much happen too early and ran off the track, when we could have won. And I had three or four laps at that point faster than anyone else that weekend. So I've got to learn to let things come to me a little slower."

Combine the speed he's already shown, and the clarity of purpose in targeting championship wins rather than individual race victories, and you've got to wonder: Could Kurtis Roberts be the best Roberts we've seen yet?

Minimoto

(full size people, small motorbikes...)

Ever since I saw mini-moto on TV I knew I had to have a go. It just looked so STUPID.

Despite laughing like a maniac I didn't fall off on the practise first lap. Although I made up for that later, in the races.

These little bikes were reaching up to 22mph on a twisty track. But they are VERY unstable and it only takes slight wiggle, too much power, you knee touching a tyre or your foot touching the ground for it all to go pear-shaped very quickly.

As the pre-requisites for being good seemed to be lightness, flexibility and a willingness to fall off I thought I would do OK. I started well but tried too hard and ended up a rather modest 20th out of 33. But at least I didn't get any injuries beyond bruises. One of the other competitors got a broken collar bone (nothing to do with me, I might add).

Sorry to the bloke I jostled/headbutted racing for the line, I came off worst anyway - crossing the line being dragged behind the bike.

I've no idea who is who in the pictures, ecept that none of them are me.

Thanks to Alie Ball for organising it.